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Full text of "Personal impressions of the Grand Cañon of the Colorado River near Flagstaff, Arizona : as seen through nearly two thousand eyes, and written in the private visitors' book of the world-famous guide, Capt. John Hance, guide, story-teller, and path-finder"

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IMPRESSIONS 

TOP THE 

I GRAND 






BANCROFT 
LIBRARY 

< 

THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIFORNIA 



X l-f 








CAPTAIN JOHN HANCE, 

The well-known Guide of the Grand Canon of the Colorado River. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS 



OF THE 



Grand Canon of the Colorado River 

NEAR FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA 

AS SEEN THROUGH NEARLY TWO THOUSAND EYES, AND 

WRITTEN IN THE PRIVATE VISITORS' BOOK 

OF THE WORLD-FAMOUS GUIDE 

CAFT. JOHN HANCE 

GUIDE, STORY-TELLER, AND PATH-FINDER 

COLLECTED AND COMPILED BY 

G. K. WOODS 




PUBLISHED FOR G. K. WOODS, FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA TERRITORV 

BY 

THE WHITAKER & RAY COMPANY 
SAN FRANCISCO 

1899 



Copyright, 1899, by 
G. K. WOODS. 



BANCROFT 
LIBRARY 



DEDICATION 

TO THE PATRONS OF THIS WORK 



'"T^HIS work is respectfully dedicated the many 
writers who have enabled me to present to 
the world ideas of what this great masterpiece of 
nature looks like (by their gratuitous contributions 
of the impression made upon their minds after 
viewing this stupendous canon), and I sincerely 
hope that the many tourists, pleasure-seekers, and 
students of nature who in the future visit this 
grand work of nature will bestow on those who 
have herein contributed to the enlightenment of 
the people at large full measure for their expressions. 
Respectfully yours, 

G. K. WOODS. 




_ J 



J. WILBUR THURBUR, 
The efficient Proprit-tor of the Stage Line from Flagstaff to the Grand Canon. 



PREFACE. 



To THE PATRONS OF THIS VOLUME: This is not 
a descriptive writing on the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado River, but a record of the impressions creat- 
ed upon the minds of individual visitors, at various 
times and under different circumstances, and written 
in the private visitors' book of Capt. John Hance, 
the famous Grand Canon guide. It covers a period 
of ten years, and partially describes the trip by stage 
from Flagstaff, Arizona, and return, under the man- 
agement of G. K. Woods, General Manager of the 
Grand Canon stage line, owned and operated by 

J. Wilbur Thurbur. 

G. K. WOODS. 

FLAGSTAFF, A. T., March I, 1899. 



CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Flagstaff, Arizona 15 

To the Traveling Public 19 

The Grand Canon of the Colorado River (by J. Curtis Wasson) 23 

Notice to the Reader 29 

Personal Impressions of the Grand Canon of the Colorado River 31 

Poem: The Grand Canon of the Colorado (by C. R. Pattee) 129 

The Stalactite Caves of the Grand Canon (by J. Curtis Wasson) 133 

"The World Is Cleft" (" Fitz-Mac" on the Wonders of the Grand Canon) . 137 

The Grand Canon Cavern 149 

An Enthusiastic Description (by G. Wharton James) 155 

The Grand Canon 161 

How to Get There 163 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Frontispiece (Capt. John Hance) PAGE 

J. Wilbur Thurbur 6 

Flagstaff, Arizona 14 

G. K. Woods 18 

Colorado River Foot of Grand View Trail 22 

Grandeur Ridge on the Grand View Trail 28 

San Francisco Mountains 35 

Cottonwood Canon 41 

Horseshoe Point Grand View Trail 47 

Mode of Travel in the Grand Canon 53 

Scene on the Grand View Trail 58 

Colorado River Looking up from Grand View Trail 67 

Water Train Grand View Trail 75 

A Resting-Place Head of Grand View Trail 83 

A Commodious Tent Grand Canon 91 

Chimney Rock Grand Canon . . 99 

Scene from Hotel Point Grand Canon 107 

Waterfall Grand Canon 115 

Original Hance Cabin, 1885 123 

Head of Cottonwood Canon Grand View Trail 128 

Scene in the Stalactite Caves 132 

Hance Falls Grand Canon 136 

Coconino Cycle Club . . 141 

Hotel and Tents Grand Canon 148 

Going to the Grand Canon 154 

Scene on the Hance Trail 160 

Grand Canon Stages at Flagstaff 162 




u 



FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA. 

THE GATEWAY TO THE GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 

Nestling at the base of the San Francisco Mountains, and pro- 
tected from Boreas's biting blasts by vast forests of pines, is Flag- 
staff, the county seat of Coconino County, or, as it has been very 
appropriately termed, " The Skylight City." It is a thriving town 
of about three thousand inhabitants, situated on the main line of 
the Santa Fe Pacific Railroad, which runs in connection with the 
Great Santa Fe system, whose branches reach out in every direction 
from the Eastern States to the Pacific Coast. 



15 




G. K. WOODS, 

The gentlemanly Manager of the Grand Canon Stage Line, to whom all 

letters for information on the Grand Canon stage and hotel 

rates, etc. are respectfully referred. 



TO THE TRAVELING PUBLIC. 

The following compilation, taken from the Visitor's Book of 
Captain John Hance, the famous guide of the Grand Canon, covers 
a period of ten years. It is put into book form under the imme- 
diate supervision of G. K. Woods, General Manager of the Grand 
Canon Stage Line, and is now on sale at his office in Flagstaff, 
Arizona. It is not written by G. K. Woods, but is made up from 
the actual sentiments of a few of the many visitors to the Grand 
Canon in the past ten years. These expressions, the reader will 
readily understand, are the ideas of the visitors, impressed upon 
their minds after viewing the Grand Canon, and written by them 
individually in the Visitor's Book, from which these data are taken. 
No well-known European or American writer could under any 
circumstance give as vivid a description of the grandeur of the 
panoramic scenery of the Grand Canon as is furnished by G. K. 
Woods's book, set forth by the hands of hundreds of visitors from 
all parts of the United States and Europe. Many of the names 
the reader will readily recognize. Further than what the following 
pages furnish nothing need be said of this region of the Grand 
Canon. Tourists on a transcontinental tour, besides enjoying the 
many comforts and privileges granted by the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe Railroad Company, are allowed stop-over privileges at 
Flagstaff, Arizona, giving ample opportunity to take in the beauties 
of the Grand Canon of the Colorado and the panoramic frontier 
scenery of the country from Flagstaff to that wonderful region. 
The trip can be made by the latest mode of transportation, ' The 
Auto-Mobile Carriage," or by the well-tried and thoroughly 
reliable Concord coach, which is the chief equipment of J. Wilbur 
Thurbur's Grand Canon Stage Line. 

After five years of careful observation from many points of the 
Grand Canon, I dedicate this work to the traveling public, with the 
assurance that the original expressions exist; and it will give me 
pleasure to produce them at any time they may be called fo at 
Flagstaff, Arizona Territory. G. K. WOODS. 

19 




COLORADO RIVER FOOT OF GRAND VIEW TRAIL. 



THE GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 
By J. CURTIS WASSON. 

From Flagstaff, the point at which tourists leave the Santa Fe 
system, for the Grand Canon of the Colorado, at 7 A.M., our stage 
and six goes out within the folds of the towering pines of the great 
Coconino Forest, driving through parks lately made verdant by the 
summer showers, until we have belted the base of the great San 
Francisco Mountains the highest and most picturesque of all the 
ranges in the Southwest mountains upon whose summits may be 
seen the perpetual snows, and from whose heights may be had the 
most extensive view in the West, and the most beautiful in all the 
ranges of the Rockies most extensive, because of the atmospheric 
conditions, as attested by the establishment of the Lowell Observa- 
tory here most beautiful, on account of the varied coloring in the 
geological formations. 

Arriving at Little Springs Station, where a new relay of horses 
is added, we make haste until the half-way station is reached, 
passing through a fine unbroken forest of Pinus ponderosa, quaking 
aspen, balsam fir, and spruce. The clear, open forest, the waving 
grasses, the gorgeously colored mountain flowers, the occasional 
chirp of the forest songsters, the clear, ice-cold springs traversing 
our smooth compact road, the peaks, clear-cut, cold, and massive, 
towering up nearly 14,000 feet into the blue above, with now and 
then a band of mountain deer bounding speedily around some 
curve, like enchanted sprites from fairyland, the low rumbling of 
our great Concord stage, the sound of two dozen hoofs, the sharp 
crack of the driver's whip, the clear, cold, bracing atmosphere, 
every breath of which seems to stimulate, the indescribably beautiful 
Painted Desert outstretching for a hundred miles to our right, 
amid such environments as these one may revel in the wonders of 
Nature and feel the magic touch of her hand divine for here 



24 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 

indeed is a drive ideal, amid scenes real, grandly austere, yet 
inspiringly touched by the sweetest of her graces. 

One fain would linger on scenes like these but we have 
arrived at Cedar Station, and after partaking of a very refreshing 
luncheon we are given a new relay of horses and hasten over the 
desert portion of our ride to Moqui Station, where another relay is 
provided, which takes us to the Canon Hotel, at the rim of the 
canon, where we arrive at 7 o'clock p. M. 

Leaving our Concord stage, giving our grips to the porter, not 
even waiting for "facial ablutions," we hasten across the yard and 
up to the rim of the canon, when, looking over the Chasm of the 
Creator, the Gulf of God, the Erosion of the Ages, lies in all its 
awfulness before us, awful, yet grand; appalling, yet attractive; 
awe inspiring, yet fascinating in its greetings. 

To speak of its dimensions as being 240 miles long, 12 to 15 
miles wide, and 6,000 feet in depth, conveys no idea of the Grand 
Canon. One must read to enjoy, see to appreciate, and examine 
to realize this, the greatest scenic attraction in the world. 

But little is absolute, much is relative, and for this reason extent 
can not be appreciated in the Grand Canon. When we are told 
that the opposite rim, which seems but a pistol-shot away, is over 
fifteen miles from where we are standing, we are amazed. When we 
are told that down a little to our left, where may be outlined but 
dimly a small mound, our eyes behold a mountain over 1,600 feet 
high; when we are told that the white sheet of water to be seen far 
down the canon, seemingly but a mere brook over which one might 
step with ease, is nearly 600 feet in width; when we are told that 
yon two pedestals which barely jut out above the basic Cliff are over 
600 feet in height; when we are told these truths and many more 
which might be added, no wonder that our eyes seem to apologize, 
and our judgment is " relegated for repairs," no wonder that we 
are awed by the enormous proportions, and the mighty magnitude 
of this Awful Abyss! 

Although our eyes and judgment may need to be readjusted 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 25 

that we may appreciate the extent of this " erosive entity," yet the 
soul never fails to respond to the entrancing charm and fascinating 
beauty of this scene of scenes, this phenomenon of phenomena. 

There is a triune strata of the canon, ranging from the limestone 
formation above, with all its graduated colors, variegated from a 
mottled sable to an ermine white, the dark juttings being grim 
imaginary statues typical of Pluto's realm, but counterbalanced 
by the statues standing here and there, lapped and overlapped, by 
the soft white folds left by the erosion of centuries, and typical of 
the heraldry of a summer clime and a kindlier kin, extending into 
the ruddy sandstone beneath, whose granulated formation invites 
that sculptor of the ages Erosion who wields her wand o'er her 
handmaids of wind and water, and asks naught for the execution of 
her mandates but cycles cycles of time and her wish is granted. 

This sandstone formation continues down to the granite, whose 
massive solidity seems a typical base upon which to rest a mile of 
statuary peaks, promontories, and mountains. 

Upon all this fancy the added beauty of the immortal glory of a 
sunset glow, whose variegated colors, hues, and tints resolve one 
into another, playing, dancing, reveling in the scenic harvest like 
fairies whose setting sun must sound their knell of doom, now 
growing bolder, keener, deeper, richer, only to again retreat to be 
combined once more. 

The sun sinks in the west, when the colors, bidding each other 
good-night, whirl as if in courtesy, and recede from sight. Their 
going has left us the poorer. Whom did they enrich ? None, 
save the fantasies of memory. 

Lost in revelry, we do not notice that the moon, whose beams 
even now, using each projecting butte as a dim lantern from which 
to reflect its glimmering, quivering light, has risen in the east. 

We then return to the Grand Canon Hotel, built upon its rim, 
and after enjoying its luxurious service, alternated by various trips 
down the several trails, we go back to Flagstaff, by the Grand 
Canon stage route, which, I am free to say, gives the swiftest and 
best service of any route in the Southwest. 




GRANDEUR RIDGE ON THE GRAND VIEW TRAIL. 



TO THE READER 



The pages which follow contain the ideas of a 
few of the many hundreds of visitors who have visited 
the Grand Canon over the Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe Route, via Flagstaff, Arizona* The reader will 
note that some of the writers reside in Arizona, but 
most of the visitors are from other portions of the 
United States and from Europe* Many of the tourists 
who have herein expressed themselves are well-known 
pleasure-seekers and admirers of Nature in her grand- 
est forms* They have visited such points of interest 
as the Alps in Switzerland, the various attractions in 
Germany, the Highlands of Scotland, have seen the 
sparkling waters of the Thames, England, the Giant's 
Causeway in Ireland, but have not kissed the blarney- 
stone* They concede that while America, from a 
scenic standpoint, has many beauties the great 
Niagara Falls, the Yellowstone Park in Montana, 
the Natural Bridge in Virginia, the Yosemite Valley 
in California, with its Mirror Lake and grand peaks 
all these sink into insignificance when compared with 
Nature's greatest attraction, the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado* 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS 

OF THB 

GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



April 16-20, 1891. 

QIFFORD PINCHOB, 

New York. 

Went to the river. Time from head of 
trail to river and back to head of trail, 
9 hours and 55 minutes. 

April 20 ', 1891. 
J. M. SIMPSON, 

The world hath many sights for the 
tourist and recreation seeker to look 
upon, but none therein contained, begin 
to compare with the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado River, as seen seventy miles 
north of Flagstaff, Arizona. 

CHARLES G. THOMAS, 
AND WIFE, Chicago, 111. 

Arrived May 15, 1891; remained two 
days. 

H. P. ALDRICH AND WIFE, 

Albuquerque, N. M. 
Arrived May 15, 1891; remained two 
days. 

May 15, 1891. 

M. J. KEYS, Correspondent, 

St. Joseph (Ho.) Gazette. 
Went to the river. Time from head of 
trail, 9 hours, 26 minutes. 

M. H. POST, M. D. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Arrived May i6th, left i8th; w,ent to 
cabin in Canon i7th. 



May 18, 

E. S. WILCOX, Flagstaff, 

Arizona. 



May 20, 

CHARLEY GREENLAW, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

May 20, 1891. 

firs. GEO. T. DORNLIFF, 

Illinois. 

I can cheerfully say that this, the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado River, is the grand- 
est sight of my life as I noticed in this 
little book of Capt. John Hance, a great 
many people say indescribable. I can 
say nothing more. It is beyond reason 
to think of describing it in any way. You 
must see it to appreciate it. A grand 
sight of this kind and so few people 
know of it. By accident I formed the 
acquaintance of two ladies en route to 
the Grand Canon. I joined them. We 
have enjoyed our trip; the stage ride 
from Flagstaff to the Grand Canon is 
grand. Good horses, competent and 
accommodating drivers. I have seen the 
Yosemite, have visited California several 
different times, in fact seen all the prin- 
cipal points of interest in the United 
States, but the most wonderful, awe-in- 
spiring piece of Nature's own work is this, 
the Grand Canon of the Colorado River. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



May 20, 1891. 

JOHN DONAHUE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

-^s*^r*^**^r**^^s>*j^s^r^s^^^ 

May 20, 1891. 

H. HELLER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

~^,r^r**^s-*^r**^~^^^-^^ 

May 22, 1891. 

E. RANDOLPH, 

Red Horse, Arizona. 

^VX-V^-X^V^-VXXX^/N^-N^-XXX^^^X-V^^^X^-^ -V-- -v-~ 

May 22, 1891. 

F. L. ARflSTRONG, 

Red Horse, Arizona. 



JOHN C. FURHAN, 



New York. 



ROBERT QRAWSHAY, 

London, England. 

Arrived May 23; left 24, 1891; and very 
sorry to have so little time. 

LAWRENCE FERRIER, 
(Via New York,) 

Edinburgh, Scotland. 



A. C. HORSE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



J. A. HARRISON, 



Chicago, 111. 



May 24., 1891. 

JAflES 5. CRAWFORD, 

Ayr, Scotland. 



May 25, 1891. 
CHARLES W. MERRILL 
AND WIFE, Indianapolis. 

X-S^NX-V^V- 

May 25, 1891. 

HERHAN D. OLESON, 

Sweden. 

I travel thousands of miles every year, 
and think I have seen all the sights of 
the world. I have been traveling for the 
past ten years. The Grand Canon of the 
Colorado River is the most wonderful 
piece of work I have ever seen. Myself 
and Capt. John Hance have been going 
for two days. Into the canon the first 
day, the rim the second. The most beau- 
tiful view I think is from Moran Point. 
Let me advise all to take one of the 
Captain's horses in going to the river. 
Thanking the good people at this hotel 
and Capt. Hance, I bid you all good-by. 

O. J. HODGE, 

VIRGINIA SHEDD HODQE, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

Arrived May 27; departed May 29, 1891. 
We have seen the Yosemite, the Yellow- 
stone, Mt. Hood, Mt. Blanc, and traveled 
through Alaska, but never saw anything 
so grand, so sublime, and so marvelous 
as the Grand Canon of the Colorado 
River from this point. God bless our 
friend John Hance ! 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



33 



May 29, 1891. 
ALFRED L. DICKENSON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



June i 

firs. D. ROBERTS, 

New York. 

My trip has been a pleasant one to the 
Grand Canon. The canon itself is beauti- 
ful. The immensity and grandeur of this 
canon cannot be appreciated unless you 
see it. No one has any idea of its great- 
ness till once you stand on the rim and 
look down upon this wonderful piece of 
Nature's own work. 



June j, 

HARRY L. YOUNG, 
HAY J. YOUNG, 

Shamokin, Pa. 

GEO. A. CLARK, 

ninneapolis, Minn. 

Arrived June 2; left June 4, 1891. 

J. B. SMITH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Arrived June 2; departed June 4, 1891. 

June jo, 1891. 

Mrs. J. C. STREETER, 

Boston. 

Nature's own work is most beautiful. 
I can scarcely believe my own eyes. I 
can say nothing. The Grand Canon is 



here. Come and see it for yourself. You 
cannot be disappointed. So far beyond 
my expectations. Captain John Hance 
is here, too. He will interest you if the 
canon doesn't. 



Thursday, June n, i8gi. 
JULES BAUMANN, Artist, 

Prescott, Arizona. 

~^^^^^>>^^^^>^^^^^^ 

D. T. McDOUGLE, U. S., 
Botanist, 

La Fayette, Ind. 

'^^ f ^/ f ^/^^^<^~^/~^^^^^ 

Thursday ', June n, 1891. 

JAMES L. STONE, 

Missouri. 



CAL. OSBON, 

Born Nov. 20, 1849, in Indiana; went 
to California in 1874; then to Oregon; 
1877, back to California, 1884; went to 
Tucson, Arizona, landed in Flagstaff, 
Arizona, 1891. I make views as a spec- 
ialty of Arizona. I have views all down 
the trail to the falls. 

Mr. and firs. J. EUGENE 
BROWNING, 

78 Cotton Exchange, 

New York City. 

Arrived June 16; left June 18, 1891. 



June 18, 1891. 
N. J. CAMERON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 



34 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



June 24, 1891. 
J. M. CLARK, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

June 24, 1891. 

W. R. WORTH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^-'N_XX^^^-^-N_>-N^-V^-N^'X^^^ 

T. A. PARSONS, 
J. fl. PARSONS, 
CHAS. PARSONS, 

All of St. Louis, Mo. 

1891. 

WALTER DOUGLASS, 

99 John St., N. Y. 

ALEX. nACKENZIE, 

11 Clift St., N. Y. 

Commercial Mining Company. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

1891. 

AUGUST J. BOWIE, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

July 18, 1891. 
J. H. WRIGHT, 

New York City. 

-S^ 

F. N. BARRETT, 

New York City. 



CHAS. E. RICKERSON, 

New York. 



JAMES M. FARRAR, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

*s**r 

CORA A. SniTH, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Went down into canon July 19, 1891. 

~**s~**s^s*^r*^r***/-^s~*^^ 

DAISY SIMPSON, 

Montreal, Canada. 

Went down into canon July 19, 1891. 

"***~^~^^r**^~<*s~*^~**ss*^^ 

CELIN JEANNETTE BARRETT, 
New York. 

Down into the canon July 19 and 20, 
1891. 

LEWIS D. BOUCHER, 

Sherbrooke, P. Q., Canada. 



GEO. W. McADAMS, 

Ellington Lake. 



July 21, 1891. 
CHAS. COLLINS, 



Springfield, Ho. 



CHAS. L. RICKERSON, 



Arizona. 



July 21, 1891. 

PABLO A. GARCIA. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



37 



Over the falls at midnight. 
The lost, strayed, or stolen party. 
Arrived on July 21, 1891; left on July 
24, 1891. 

L. H. WRIGHT, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

MARY KELLAM, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

ARLETTA BRODE, 

Buda, 111. 

LAURA HOXWORTH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 
IRENE HOXWORTH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

S. N. PECK, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

J. R. LOCKETT, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

E. A. SLIKER, 

Cincinnati, O. 

Chaperoned by Mrs. J. F. DAQQS, 
Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Oh, what fun at the last falls ! Ask any 
of the party about it. 



A. NELSON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August p, 1891. 

D. P. HOOKER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

WM. MERRELL, 

Leaven worth, Kan. 

Went down in canon wkh D. P. Hooker, 
August 10, 1891, to cabin, and returned 
same day. Mr. Merrell's age is eighty 
years. 



F. FAIRCHILDS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August 16) i8yi. 

THEO. F. HOLDEN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August 16, 1891. 

GEO. B. JOHNSON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^~X_X-N 

August 16, 1891. 

HELENA JOHNSON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August 16, 1891. 

ELIZABETH HOLDEN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August 16^ 1891. 
W. F. HULL. 

First entered the canon June 22, 1884; 
June 26, 1884, commenced surveying road 
from canon to Cedar Ranch, in company 
with Silas Ruggles and John Hance. First 
visit to the canon in February, 1880. 

I. O. O. F., K. of P., F. A. M. 

August 17, 1891. 
QEO. R. DECAflP. 

This is the greatest sight on earth. I 
have seen almost everything in the way 
of canons, but this beats them all. You 
will have to see it; no one can tell you 
about it. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



August 18, 1891. 

D. E. ISABELLE, 

E. n. ISABELLE, 
firs. M. W. HALL, 

All of Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August 19, 1891^ 
fl. F. QENNINQS. 



Hiss HARRIETT COLTON, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



FLORENCE N. DUKES, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



EMflA SPALDINQ, 

Prescott, Arizona. 



ALICE METZ, 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Lieut. Q. H. HORGAN, U. S. A., 
Late of Texas. 



firs. WM. CARROLL, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



JOHN DONOVON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



C. E. HOWARD, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



P. H. HOLT, 



Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August 19, 1891. 

Hr. and Mrs. Q. W. MEYLERT, 
Mr. and firs. A. A. KEEN, 
firs. ANDREW SHITH, 
Hiss LILLIAN HIRST, 

Albuquerque, 
firs. T. J. WOODS1DE, 

El Paso, 
firs. S. S. PRATT, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
L. M. LATTA, 

Bluewater, N. Y. 
H. PERKINS, 

Holbrook, Arizona. 
Chaperoned by 

firs. Q. W. HEYLERT. 

Left for Flagstaff on the morning of 
August 21, 1891. 



August 21, 1891. 
Mr. and Mrs. Q. T. HAYES. 

We have enjoyed our trip. It is worth 
seeing. Wish we could stay a week. The 
grandest sight of our lives. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



39 



August 21, 1891. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. FAIRCHILDS 
AND FAMILY, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 

VXV^X^^-^-VXV^-VX-N^V^^^X^^x-N ------ -^.-N^V^-V^^^^^-^^^V 

J. C. GRIM, 
Mrs. J. C. GRIM, 
FRED GRIM, 
BURTON GRIM, 
CLARA GRIM, 
LILLIE JONES, 

All of Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August jo, 

GEO. McCORMICK, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



A. J. COOPER, 
GEO. SMITH, 
D. K. TRIPP, 

All of Chicago, III. 



August jo, 

J. W. WATSON, 

ist Lieut. loth Cavalry, 

Ft. Bayard, N. M. 

_^^-^s^^-^^-N^^V^V^N^^>^^^^X^>^V^V^>^X^-\^X^ 

August jo, 1891. 

J. W. HEARDY, 

First Lieut. 3d U. S. Cavalry, 
San Antonio, Texas. 



August jo, 

F. G. IRWIN, 

First Lieut. Second U. S. Cavalry, 
Fort Bowie, Arizona. 



August ji, 1891. 

M. R. PETERSON, 

Second Lieut. Tenth Infantry, 

Fort Wingate, N. M. 

August ji, i<$pi. 

EUGENE HARLOW, 

From Johnnie Bull's Islands. 

Visited the canon and all trails, in com- 
pany with Captain Hance. Very grand, 
and I think I shall show my good sense 
not trying to descend this unique canon of 
the earth. 



J. W. POWERS, 

Washington, D. C. 



D. M. RIORDAN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



September 26^ 1891. 

MARY CAROLINE HUGHES, 

Cambridge, Eng. 

Dr. FRITZ FRECH, 

Berlin, Germany. 

Dr. WRIFINZ, 

Tubingen, Germany. 

Dr. D. MARCHAND, 

Photo Artist London "Graphic." 
Dr. Baron SIBNEY WOHRMANN 
HOLHEN, 

Livonia, Germany. 
Dr. A. BOTPLETZ, 

Municha, Germany. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



Dr. H. CREDNER. 

Leipzig, Germany. 

Dr. JOHANNES WALTHER, 

Feria, Germany. 

Dr. RUDOLF CRIDNER, 

Germany. 
Dr. A. ULRICH, 

Strasburg, Deutchland. 

H. M. CADELL, 

Grange Boness, Scotland. 

WILLARD D. JOHNSON, 

Washington, D. C. 

ALFRED HARKER, 
WM. KERNEY HUGHES, 

Cambridge, England. 

Dr. AUG. STRENG, 

Professor from Giessen, Ger. 

Dr. D. J. BRANNEN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Dr. JOHN R. HAYNES, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Dr. GEO. V. J. BERINE, 

Halle A. L., Germany. 

F. PLIENINGER, 
- KAYSER, 

Marburg, Germany. 

1. ROMBURG, 

Berlin, Germany. 

Dr. CARL DIERMER, 

Vienna, Austria. 
H. TOLLIEZ, 

Professor University Lausanne, 
Switzerland. 

ERNEST VANDEN BROEK, 

Buinelles, Belgieque. 

MORZ LOHERTS1EGE, 

Belgieque. 



Dr. V. ZiTTEL, 

Municha, Germany. 
E. DeMARGERIE, 

Paris, France. 
Dr. BURGEART, 

"Mente et Malleo," 

Munchen, Bayern. 

The above parties belonging to the In- 
ternational Geological Congress. 

Dr. GEO. H. POWERS, 
CORNELIA C. POWERS, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Mrs. A. D. MARCHAND, 
Mr. A. D. MARCHAND, 

268 S. Main Street, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



September, 1891. 
E. R. HERMAN, 



California. 



By all means visit the Grand Canon of 
the Colorado River, in Arizona. See 
Hance, too. 

October 3, 1891. 

Mrs. GEO. WINFIELD ROOPE, 
Boston, Mass. 

October 3, 1891. 
C. C. HITCHCOCK, 
M. E. HITCHCOCK, 

Ware, Mass. 

We repeat the sentiment expressed by 
O. J. Hodge, that "we have visited the 
Yosemite, the Yellowstone, Mt. Hood, 
Mt. Blanc, and traveled through Alaska, 




COTTONWOOD CANON LOOKING NORTH ON GRAND VIEW TRAIL 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



43 



but never saw anything so grand, so sub- 
lime, and so marvelous as the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado, from this point. 
God bless our friend John Hance." 



A. H. SMUTZ, 



Fresno, Cal. 



October j*, 1891. 
C. C. HITCHCOCK. 

Left head of trail for river at 6:40 A.M., 
reached Hance's cabin, 7:55 A.M.; arrived 
at Colorado River, 10 A.M.; started-on re- 
turn trip, 10:35 A.M.; arrived at cabin; 
12:55 P.M.; left cabin, 1:15 P.M.; arrived 
at head of trail 4:22 P.M. Time, nine 
hours and forty-two minutes. 



October j 
G. E. TUTTLE. 

Talk about holes in the ground, well, 
this is one of them. I have been in the 
canon to-day. Don't intend to go in any 
more. I am completely out of anything 
to say. Come and see it for yourselves. 
No one can tell you about it. I have seen 
the world, but had not seen near all of it, 
until I saw this canon. Farewell, Captain; 
am coming again. Will bring a party with 
me next time. Thanks for your kind- 
ness, etc. 

October ij, 1891. 

JOHN T. WALLACE, 

Monte Vista, Colo. 



October 13, 1891. 
O. S. GARNER, 



Massachusetts. 



Of all the sights in the world this is the 
greatest sight I ever have seen. Words 
cannot tell the grandeur, beauty, im- 
mensity, and sublimity of this wonderful 
production of Nature's own work. I 
would advise all tourists to visit this 
canon. You cannot be disappointed. 
The beautiful forests we travel through 
going to the canon is worth the trip 
alone. I am coming again to stop here 
for a month. I have visited many placesi 
but this beats them all. Good-by. O. S. G. 

November 7, 1891. 
Mr. F. J. HOCHDERFFER, 
Mrs. F. J. HOCHDERFFER, 
ROSE HOCHDERFFER, 
EMMA HOCHDERFFER, 
ROCK HOCHDERFFER, 
CLEVELAND HOCHDERFFER, 
Of Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^>*^s~^ 

April <?, 1892. 

First of the Season. 
HORACE C. HOVEY, 

Middletown, Conn. 

Intended to come last fall with Geo- 
logical Congress, but am contented to 
open the ball for 1892, " Mente et Mal- 
leo," as special correspondent of Scientific 
American. Went down Hance trail with 
Mr. Boucher, and stayed over night, re- 
turning next day; enjoyed it immensely. 
Found the trail in excellent order, and 
made the trip comfortably. 



44 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



ipril 9, 1892. 
JOHN J. TRILTON 



New Mexico. 



Arrived here all O. K. Went up to the 
rim of canon ; was far beyond my expecta- 
tions. Of all the grand sights in the world 
Ihis is one of them. I have visited in 
Europe, Alaska, have seen the Yellow 
stone, all the different places in Califor- 
nia, but nothing comes up to this. No 
one could tell you of it. No language 
could ever tell you the grandeur, the 
beauty, the immensity of this wonderful 
canon. I would like to have all my 
friends here at this hour to view this, 
Nature's own work, with me. Farewell, 
Captain; I hope to see you again. 

April 14, 1892. 

Mr. and Mrs. MARSHALL, 
Miss F. E. MARSHALL, 
C. M. MARSHALL, 

All of Flagstaff, Arizona. 

April 75, 1892. 

T. A. RIORDAN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

April 15, 1892. 

T. R. GABLE, 

Albuquerque, N. M. 

April 18, 1892. 

The John D. Hoff Abestos Co. 
By JOHN D. HOFF, 

Of San Diego, Cal. 



JOHN I. McCOOK, 

New York, N. Y, 



ARCHIBALD ALEXANDER, 

New York. 



MA1TLAND ALEXANDER, 

New York, N. Y, 



C. CHARMLEY, 



Chicago, 111, 



SAMUEL COLMAN, 

Newport, Rhode Island. 



JOHN J. LARKIN, 

St. Paul, Minn. 



LOUIS SPEARS, 
I. F. WHEELER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 

May 12^ 1892. 

WM. CAREY, 

Colonel H. B. M., Royal Artillery, 
"Retired" (Cox & Co.) 

London, England. 

May if, 1892. 

T. Q. DANIELLS, 

F. W. VAN SICKLEN, 
W. A. BISSEL, 

G. P. REYNOLDS, 

All of Alameda, Cal. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



May 77, 1892. 
J. H. HOSKINS, Jr., 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^-s^-^->_^^-^--^> > , , ,_ ^-^~^*^-^^s~ ^-^-^^^^ 

May 21, 1892. 
HERMAN WESTERMAN, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 



J. S. BUNNELL, 

San Francisco, Cal, 



W. F. CLARKE, 



CHAS. F. LUMMIS, 



New York. 



Isleta, N. H. 



May 24^ 1892. 
W. H. JACKSON, 



Denver, Colo. 



May 24.) 1892. 
T. MORAN, 

N^X-N^ ^-\^XX"N 

May 24, 

C. A. HIGGINS, 

\~r^r^r*^^s-^^s^^s~^ 

May 24, 1892. 

PAUL N. MORAN, 



New York. 



Chicago, 111. 



New York. 



May 24, 1892. 
SAM C. TAYLOR, 

Denver, Colo. 

ALBERT MAQEE AND WIFE, 
I. R. BAXLEY AND WIFE, 

All of Santa Barbara, Cal. 

I could hope that those who come to 
the canon would get Hance to show them 
something of what he knows, and that is 
more than can be suspected simply on the 
first outlook. Much of my intense pleas- 
ure I owe to him. I. R. B. 

J. QARNETT AND DAUGHTERS, 
HAROLD ECCLER, 

London, England. 

E. B. REYNOLDS, 
E. A. REYNOLDS, 

South Bend, Indiana. 

Arrived June 10; left June 12, 1892. 



June 14, 1892. 
I. S. QOFORTH, 

Georgetown, N. M. 

June 14, 1892. 
G. B. INGRAM, 

Fayetteville, Arkansas. 



June 16, 1892. 
GEO. PRIME, 



Flagstaff, Arizona. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



June 7j>, 1892. 
H. H. WATKINS, 
Mrs. H. H. WATKINS, 

Kingman, Ariz. 

^^^r^^r^r^^r^^r^^^^~^^^^ 

June 7j, 1892. 

S. T. ELLIOTT, 
Mrs. S. T. ELLIOTT, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

'~**~r^r**^>-*^s-**^*^^^ 

June 7j>, 1892. 

J. H. HARSHALL, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



June 7J, 1892. 

Mrs. A. T. CORNISH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

~^>-**^^r^s-*>*^~^^^ 

June 7j, 1892. 

A. A. ALLESTER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



June 13, 1892. 
ANNIE L. ROSS, 



June 13, 1892. 
S. L. ROUSH, 



Flagstaff, Ariz. 



Eldon, Iowa, 



June 7j, 1892. 

ROBERT McCANN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



June 7j>, 1892. 

SAMUEL BAXTER, 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 

~***~s***^*~^~s^r<*^*^^ 

Jiine /./, 1892. 

ALICE WAINWRIGHT, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

RUSSELL H. MONRO, 
EMLIE MONRO, 

Market Harboro, England. 
WM. B. DOWD, 
CHAS. T. WING, 

New York City. 
All with the AI cattle outfit. 



June 75, 1892. 
R. C. DRYDEN, 



June 75, 1892. 
F. W. SMITH, 



C. C. TILLSON, 



Winslow, Ariz, 



Winslow, Ariz, 



Pueblo, Colo. 



WM. SHROYER, 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 

**<~S~**S~*^S~***S~**-S~*>~S^ I ^^ 

GEO. K. SMITH, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

*~*^*>~^r<^>^ l >^s~^ l ^^ lf ~^^ 

FRED GOODRICH, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 




HORSESHOE POINT ON THE GRAND VIEW TRAIL, NORTH 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



49 



VIC. E. HANNY, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

'^ 

June 28, 1892. 

GEO. MARSHALL, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

I arrived at Flagstaff on the 25th of 
June, 1892, from Syracuse, N. Y., and 
started on the 26th of June for the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado by stage line. 
After riding all day through some of the 
largest forests of pines, and the most 
beautiful valleys that I have everseen, I ar- 
rived at the canon just when the sun was 
setting. On the morning of June 27th, 
myself and several others were guided 
over the trail and into the canon by 
Captain John Hance. After winding 
around here and there over the trail for 
several miles, we reached the river, which 
is a grand sight. After resting an hour, 
and a plunge in the river, we started for 
the rim, arriving about dusk. I have 
traveled over the United States, have 
seen about all the sights, but I have 
never seen such a wonderful and mar- 
velous piece of nature's own work as 
this, the Grand Canon of the Colorado 
River. 



June 28, 1892. 

Rev. N. F. NORTON, 

Rev. E. Q. POOLER AND WIFE. 



June jo, 1892. 
JAMES KASSON, 

St. Paul, Minn. 

^^-s- 

June jo, 1892. 

R. C. JEFFERSON, 



St. Paul, Minn. 



July 5, 1892. 
A. NEALON. 



Ju'y 5, 1892. 
E. CAMPBELL. 



HAL C. WYflAN, 
GLADYS WYflAN. 



Detroit, Hich 



JOS. B. VERKAMP, 



Cincinnati. 



W. BABBITT, 



July 8, 1892, 
H. T. SMITH, 



Flagstaff, A. T. 



Prescott, A. T. 



June jo, 1892. 
D. K. TRIPP, 



Chicago, III. 



Miss MADIE CHRISMAN, 

Portland, Or. 

Come June 22, 1892, Summer at Grand 
Canon. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



July p, 

r\rs. JOHN Z. T. VARMER. 

I have never witnessed anything like 
this. It scares me to even try to look 
down into it. My God, I am afraid the 
whole country will fall into this great hole 
in the ground. 



July 1 

Rev. ROBERT COLTMAN, 

Pastor ist Presbyterian church, 
M. J. COLTflAN, 
JENNIE R. COLTHAN, 

Flagstaff, A. T. 



July 10, 1892. 
BLANCH METZ, 



Cincinnati, O. 



10, 
J. C. SANCHEZ, 



July io t ip2. 
JOHN H. HICKS, 



flilton, A. T. 



Milton, A. T. 



July io> ip2. 

MOLLIE CLEHMENTS, 

Baltimore, rid, 



A. WALGREEN, 

Lapland, Sweden. 



J. W. TOUriEY, 

E. O. WOOTON, Botanist, 

Botanical and Entomological party, 
from experiment stations at Tucson, 
Ariz., and Las Cruces, N. M. 

H. H. SWARTHOUT, 

Anderson, Mich. 



R. R. LARKINS, 

Las Cruces, N. M, 

'^S-^V^'XX^w^V.^VXX^N^^^XN.^^ 

CLAWRENCE T. HAQERTY, 

Las Cruces, N. M, 

^^^XXXX^^N^^XXX^-N^^X-N 

C. H. TYLER TOWNSEND, 

Entomologist exper. stn. 

Las Cruces, N. n. 

A. B. CORDLEY, 

Asst. U. S. Entomologist, 

Washington, D. C. 



July 



GERTRUDE B. STEVENS. 



This is a warm place. I fainted when 
I saw this awful looking canon. I never 
wanted a drink so bad in my life. Captain, 
I won't forget you for bringing me the 
oyster-can full of water. Good-by. 

Mrs. JOHN T. CHARHER. 

The grandest, the most wonderful, the 
greatest sight on earth. I can never for- 
get it. Visit the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado River. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



E. S. QOSNEY, 



Flagstaff, A. T. 



WINCUP AND WIFE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



M. S. NORHAN AND WIFE, 
Miss JESSIE NORMAN, 

St. Joe, Mo. 



C. W. NOYES AND WIFE, 

Boston, Mass. 



Miss R. J. HACY, 



Los Angeles. 



C. E. HOLLAND, 



Phoenix, A. T. 



O. A. TURNER, 

fladison, now of Phoenix. 



BEN DONEY, 
Mrs. DONEY, 
BENNIE DONEY, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 



MARY QUINN, 



JOHN WESLEY LEANDDER, 

Texas, 



C. W. HARDY, 



Cleveland, Ohio. 



R. H. CRAWFORD, 

Toronto, Ont., C. 

July, 1892. 

HENRY B. THORN. 

Hurrah for the Canon and John Hance. 

July Ij, 1892. 

OLIVER S. WESTCOTT, 

Principal North Division High School, 
Chicago. 

Mrs. ELIONER O. WESTCOTT, 
Chicago. 



J. W. FLANDERS, 

Traveler for J. C. Ayer & Co. 



F. B. HIQQINS, 



Flagstaff, A. T. 



Greenville, S. C. 



J. B. STEINMETZ, 

New Paris, Ind. 

^^^^^-^^^^^^^^^^^ 

July 14, 1892. 

HENRY R. WADE. 

By Joe ! this canon takes the whole 
shooting-match. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



July 15, 1892. 

Mrs. Q. P. PETERS. 

I have visited the whole world. I 
travel nine months in the year. I have 
never seen anything so grand as a sunset 
view of the Grand Canon of the Colorado 
River. 



July 16, 

C. M. FUNSTON, 

Editor Coconino Sun, 
Mrs. C. H. FUNSTON, 
MARY FUNSTON, 
HELEN FUNSTON, 
HANNAH FUNSTON, 

All of Flagstaff, Ariz. 

/-\^X^-S_X-^X-X_X-N^-V 

nELIE E. LOWRY, 

Indianapolis, Indiana. 

^^X-V^-v^ 

MARY SMITH. 

Our crowd, ladies and all, made trip 
from cabin to river, back to cabin and up 
to head of trail in one day. According 
to Mr. Hance, beating the record made 
by ladies. 

r^^~^s-^/^s~^-S 

M. M. CROCKER, M. D., 
Mrs. M. M. CROCKER, 

Ft. flojave, Arizona. 

^^^^r^r-^^^^r^^^r^s-^s-^^ 

LUCY STILLWELL, 

Ft. nojave, Ariz. 
JULIA STILLWELL, 

Cuba, flo. 



July 20, 1892. 

Mrs. AMANDA LOCKETT, 

69 yrs. old. 
H. C. LOCKETT, 
Miss ROSA CLARK, 

Mrs. E. F. QREENLAW, 

Four of us and no more of us. 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



J. J. WEIMER, 



Winslow, A. T, 



MINNIE VANPELT, 



Chicago, 111. 



VIOLA F. STEKEY, 

Greenfield, O. 



F. A. GULLY AND WIFE, 

Tucson, Ariz. 



C. B. COLLINGWOOD, 

Tucson, Ariz. 



July 22, 1892. 
n. T. WARDEN. 

This is the spot of all spots on earth. 
I would like to locate on this spot for 
about a year. 




THE MODE OF TRAVEL IN THE GRAND CANON. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



55 



July 24, 1892. 

EDITH ALVORD, 
BELL SWITZER, 
LULA CiRAHAM, 
Mrs. W. A. SWITZER, 
W. H. SWITZER. 
BURT CAMERON, 
H. J. RAND, 
STANLEY SYKES, 

AH of Flagstaff, Ariz. 

***ST>*^^>^^~*^~*^~^^ 

July 29, 1892. 

M. M. KIRKMAN AND PARTY. 

Mr. M. W. KIRK, 

Dr. W. J. HAWKS, 

Mr. ARCHIBALD HcNEAL, 

Hr. A. T. HcCORMICK, 

The unsuspecting profit. 
flaster A. T. KIRKHAN, 
riaster fl. J. KIRKMAN. 

July 29, 1892. 

F. F. JAQUES, 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Sunday, July jo, 1892. 

E. P. S. ANDREWS AND WIFE, 
Mrs. H. P. HINE, 
JERRY MILLAY AND WIFE, 
LEON BOUVIER, 

All of Phoenix, Arizona. 

ALEX LEE MARCHANT, B. A., 
London, England. 



August z, 1892. 
W. E. THORNE, 

Kansas City, Mo, 



August 4, 1892. 
HARRY E. WOOD, 

Kansas City, flo, 

^X^X^X^X^-V^X^N^XX-XXX^XX-X^-XX-X^-X^XXXX-V^X^X^-^'X^X^-x. 

August 4, 1892. 

N. B. MCDOWELL, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



FRANK RUMSEY, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August 4, 1892. 
JAMES E. LAVELLE, 

Albuquerque, N. M. 



August 4, 1892. 
CHAS. B. BARKER, 

The Grand Canon is the most wonder- 
ful thing I ever looked at. Surely worth 
seeing. 



August 5, 1892. 
J. C. HERNDON, 



Prescott, Ariz. 



T. G. NORRIS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 



CHAS. W. HERNDON, 

Prescott, Arizona. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



August 5, 1892. 

The champion athletic pedestrian vis- 
itors, under the auspices of 

WM. McINTIRE, 

Bellemont, Arizona. 
Mrs. T. J. GRACE, 
Miss GRACE L. GRACE, 
Miss MARY PRIME, 
Mr. J. WESBY, 

AH of Bellemont, A. T. 

Miss HATTIE J. HOPSON, 

Washington, D. C. 



Hiss MARTHA McINTIRE, 

Clay Center, Kansas. 



August i2> 1892. 
C. H. SPEERS, 

Asst. G. P. A. A. & P. R. R. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



August 1 
E. P. GRAY, C. V. R. R., 

San Francisco, Cal. 

August 12^ 1892. 
A. E. flARCHAND, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



AugUSt 1 

JOHN F. MCCARTHY, 

Formerly of Cincinnati, now of San 
Francisco, Cal. Wabash R. R. 



August 1 

H. S. VAN SLYCK, 
A. & P. R. R. 

Albuquerque, N. n. 



August 12, 1892. 

Hr. and Mrs. H. G. PATTERSON, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

GEO. D. HOOPER, 

Captain, I wish I were in your place to 
view this great canon every day. One 
would never get tired of it. What a grand 
sight. 

August 13, 

J. I. THORNTON, 

Mrs. GEO. F. THORNTON, 

Williams. 

August 13, 1892. 

Hiss HAY ANDERSON, 

Alabama. 

Augvst ij, 1892. 

Miss PERRIN, 

Hiss HELEN PERRIN, 

E. B. PERRIN, Jr., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



August 14, 

E. L. NORRIS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona 

August 14) 1892. 

C. LEWIS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



57 



August 14, 1892. 

ED. T. GALE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August 7 
Hr. and firs. JOSEPH B. CROSBY, 
Boston, Mass. 

Arrived at John Hance's summer ranch 
7:05 P.M.; leave 6:30 A.M., August 18, 1892. 

August 15, 1882. 

rirs. JOHN R. BARTLETT, 

Providence, R. I. 



August 18, 

BEN SKINNER, 
. PATTON, 
Both of Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August 1 8, 

firs. W. H. YANCEY, 
Miss STELLA YANCEY, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Miss SUE RUflSEY, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

fir. ROBERT FRE1DL1NE, 

August ip, 1892. 
L. H. MASSIE, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

August 19, 1892. 
LOY J. BROWN, 

flartinsburg, Audran Co., Mo. 



August 19, 1892 
Col. FRANK HULL, Jr., 

The Grand Canon is so far more won- 
derful than Yosemite Valley or Yellow- 
stone Park or any interesting points in 
the world. It is so grand and beautiful 
that no pen of any living author can de- 
scribe it. 

August 20, 1891. 
WM. FRANCIS HULL, 
ALICE GERTRUDE HULL, 

Both of San Francisco, Cal. 



August 20, 1892. 

SUSIE E. BUSH, 

Albuquerque, N. fl. 



August 20) 1892. 

firs. LISSIE HORRELL, 

Williams, Arizona. 



August 20> 1892. 

Mrs. KATE JOHNSTON, 

Williams, Arizona. 



August 20, 1892. 
fliss MAUD DICKENSON, 

Williams, Arizona. 

_/"v/- 

August 20> 1892. 

Hiss flAUD HILL, 

Albuquerque, N. fl. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



JOHN WOOD, 



Williams, Arizona. 

-^K^X^N^/^^XV^-* 

HENRY C. CORBIN, 

U. S. Army. 

x - x "^' > ^" s -' l " s '^'''>-^'^'~^-*~s^ 

August 20, 1892. 

NORMAN S. BRIDGE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

^^^^^^^^ 

August 20, 1892. 

WALTER S. HAINES, 

Chicago, 111. 

~******-*~**^^****~>*r***r*>^^^ 

August 21, 1892. 

Mrs. WM. POWELL AND CHIL- 
DREN, 

Misses EVA DUTTON, 

ETTA POWELL, 
DELLA POWELL, 
JENNIE COLTMAN, 
LEONA POWELL, 

Mrs. Dr. FRANCIS, 

HISS EMMA POWELL, 

W. M. FISHER, 

CHAS. CLARK, 

WM. POWELL, 

\. A. POWELL, 

HENRY AVERITS, 

DEMPSEY POWELL, 

All of Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August 23, 

ALFRED AVERYT, 

Shelby, Alabama. 



August 23, 1892. 
Mrs. R. M. FRANCIS, 

Chillicotho, Missouri. 

-^V^S^^V-* 

August 23, 1892. 
Miss JENNIE R. COLTMAN, 

Washington, D. C. 



August 23, 1892. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. STEVENS, 
St. Paul, Minn, 



August 23, 1892. 

firs. J. H. HOSKINS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona 



August 23, 1892. 
Miss M. E. BECKWITH, 

Baltimore, Md. 



August 23, 1892. 
C. E. HOWARD, 



Flagstaff, Ariz. 



August 23, 1892. 

J. J. TAYLOR AND WIFE, 

El Paso, Texas. 

Went to the river and back; too tired 
to write any more. 




SCENE ON THE GRAND VIEW TRAIL 



GRAND CAftON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



61 



August 27, 1892. 

MARY L. STRIGHT, 

Jemez Hot Springs, 

Archuleta P. O., N. M. 

Went to the rock cabin the afternoon 
of August 25th. The next day went from 
there to the river and back, and arrived 
at the rim this morning (August 27th) at 
half-past ten o'clock. 



August 28, 

ALEX. McDERMID AND WIFE, 
Flagstaff, Arizona. 



August 28, 

J. WOODBRIDCiE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

August 29, 1892. 

Captain W. HOFFMAN, WIFE, 

AND CHILD, 

U. S. Army. 



September 4, 1892. 
J. W. WILSON, 

^^^x^N-^^-^^-^X^^^x-^-^X-^^N^-N^X-V^X 

September 4, 1892. 
STEPHEN FANCY, 

^V/^y^X^X^X/XXX/X/X^N-^N^X^y^ 

September 4, 1892. 
AUGUST REISHEL, 



Denver, Colo. 



Aspen, Colo. 



Turkey. 



September 4, 1892. 
SCHUYLER CASE, 



Denver, Colo. 



September 7, 1892. 

WM. H. ALLEY AND WIFE, 

Chicago. 

Visited Moran Point and Grand View 
Point; went down Hance Trail to riven 
All should be visited, if strength and time 
permits. 

September 8, 1892. 

Dr. GEO. H. POWERS, 
firs. CORELIA C. POWERS, 
RUTH POWERS, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

September 8, 1892. 

Mrs. J. D. HOOKER, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Septembers, 1892. 
JOHN H. HICKS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

September 12, 1892. 

Mrs. J. D. DeRUSSY, 
J. DALE DeRUSSY, 

Col. nth Inf. U. S. Army. 
Mrs. B. F. POPE, 

All of Whipple Barracks, A. T. 

September 12, '1892. 

I. G. C. LEE, 

B. V. T. Lieut. Col. U. S. Army. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

The grandeur of the views of this day 
must surely leave a life-long impression. 
They repay for all the fatigue. I predict 
that this canon will become one of the 
most noted and visited spots of our 
country. It should be made a great 
national park. 



62 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



September 13, 1892. 

Col. FRANK HULL, Jr., 

New York. 

After having visited all the noted places 
in both Europe and America, I have seen 
nothing to compare with the sublimity of 
the Grand Canon. I should advise all 
Americans to see the most splendid sight 
of their own country before going abroad. 
I spent several days fishing in the canon, 
and caught many large salmon. I also 
looked at several of the rich mines, and 
found to my utter amazement that they 
were laden with valuable treasures. It 
will only be a short time until these mines 
will be opened up and the ore exported 
to all parts of the world. 



September 15, 1892. 

WM. W. MITCHELL, 
ELLA MITCHELL, 

Cadillac, Mich. 



September, 15, 1892. 

EDWARD F. HOBART, 
MARION C. HOBART, 

Santa Fe, N. M, 



September 15, 1892. 

LEVI DAVIS, 

Lima, Adams County, III. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

September 15, 1892. 

WALTER E. HALL, M. D., 
Mrs. MARY H. HALL, 

Burlington, N. J, 



September 15, 1892. 
JESSIE and CHAS. EVERETTE, 

This canon is simply immense too 
big to look at. 

September 25, 1892. 
C. W. WOODIN, 

Lancaster, Ohio. 

September 28 \ 1892. 
J. C. BROWN, 

East Saginaw, Mich. 



September 28 ', 1892. 
S. B. HILL, 



Chicago. 



September 30, 1892, 

J. A. LAMPORT, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

September 30, 1892. 

C. H. FANCHER, 

Albuquerque, N. M. 

September 30, 1892. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. HOLHES, 

The grandest, the greatest, the most 
wonderful sight in the world. No one 
can tell the immensity of this grand 
canon. 

October 3, 1892. 

LOWISE BIQLOW TYLER, 

North Adams, Mass. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



October if, 1892. 

S. W. HIBBEN, 
H. CLEMENT, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

D. MITCHELL, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

We left rim at 8 o'clock A.M., arrived 
at cabin at 9.45 A.M.; arrived at river, 
12:10 P.M.; back to rim, 5:10 P.M. Time 
for entire trip, nine hours and ten min- 
utes, thus beating the world's record. 

John Hance will verify 



October 75, 1892. 

ARTHUR LITTLEJOHN, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

^r^^^f^^,^^^^^^^i>^^^^ 

October 30, 1892. 
JOHN H. BOWMAN, 
Mrs. J. H. BOWMAN, 

Holbrook, Arizona. 



October 30, 

A. E. NETTLETON, 

Syracuse, N. Y 



October 30, 
JAMES W. UPSON, 
Mrs. LILLIAN B. UPSON, 

Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

This party all went to the river without 
a guide. They rated it very grand, and all 
that has been claimed. However, if future 
parties of camping ladies intend going 
down, would advise them to employ the 



guide, and go prepared for roughing it. 
The ladies should wear very short wide 
skirts, and have Hance's burros to help 
them up from the cabin. 



November 14, 1892. 
W. F. CODY (Buffalo Bill), 

QEO. P. EVERHART, 

Chicago, III. 
JAMES T. WELLS, 

Salt Lake City. 
ALLISON NAILOR, 

Washington, D. C. 
FRANK D. BALDWIN, 
JOHN M. BURKE, 

U. S. Army. 
H. S. BOAL, 

North Platte, Neb. 
WM. D. DOWD, 

Flagstaff, A. T. 
R. H. HASLAM, 

Chicago, 111. 

Piper Heidsieck. 

E. C. BRADFORD, 

Denver, Colo. 
W. HENRY flACKINNON, 

England. 
W. H. BROACH, 

North Platte, Neb. 
DANIEL SEEQMILLER, 

MERRITT S. INGRAHM, 

Washington, D. C. 

Buffalo Bill Expedition to Grand 
Canon of Colorado. 

Universal comment is that it is too 
sublime for expression, too wonderful to 
behold, without awe, and beyond all 
power of mortal description. 



6 4 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



November 14, 1892. 

EDWARD B. RUSSELL, 

Boston, Mass. 

'^~**S~^r\S^-^^S^r^r^/*^^^ 

November 14, 1892. 

HERBERT EARLSCLIFFE, 



Close of the visiting record for the 
year 1892. 



January 25, 

WM. O. O'NEILL, 

God made the canon, John Hance the 
trails. Without the other, neither would 
be complete. 

[The above name, Wm.O. O'Neill (better 
known in Arizona as "Buckey" O'Neill), 
who has written his name in this private 
visitors' book, was killed while defend- 
ing his country, between the hours of 10 
and ii A.M., July i, 1898, near Santiago 
de Cuba. He was made Captain of Troop 
A, ist U. S. Volunteer Cavalry, and was 
making ready for the charge on San Juan 
Hill, Santiago de Cuba, when he was 
struck by a Mauser bullet and killed. 

Captain O'Neill was carried from the 
front about two hundred yards back from 
where he fell, on what is known as 
" Bloody Ford," on San Juan Creek, and 
buried by Chaplain Brown, Corporal C. 
C. Jackson (of Flagstaff, Arizona), Pri- 
vates Robt. Wren, Teddy Burke, and 

Vansicklin.] 



January 25, 1893. 
JOHN HARSHALL, 

Good luck for 1893. 



Easter Sunday, April 2, 

Trusting you will have an enjoyable 
season, we are yours truly, 

JOHN M. WHITMAN, 

Chicago, HI. 
HOMER M. WILLIAHS AND 

WIFE, 
firs. E. W. DOWLING, 

New York. 
DANIEL RUTTER AND WIFE. 

P. S. We are reported the first visitors 
of the season, and cannot find words to 
express our admiration and astonish- 
ment of the Grand Canon. 



J. LOGAN SAflPLE, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 



JAHES A. PITTS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



M. M. FISHER, 



Flagstaff, A. T, 



Dr. C. B. PENROSE, 
Mrs. PENROSE, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



April ij, 189 j. 

J. A. OBER AND WIFE, 

Milford, N. H, 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



April 18, 1893. 
TOMMIE ASHURST, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



April 18, 1893. 
Miss CHRISMAN, 



Flagstaff, A. T. 



April 20, 
Miss L. BALLAD, 

Portland, Maine. 



April 20, 1893. 

Miss IRENE HUNT, 

Newport, R. I. 



JNO. M. CLARK, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Arrived the i8th; left the 2ist of April, 
1893- 



April, 1893. 
Mr. and Mrs. WOLSELEY, 

British Guiana. 



April, 1893. 

Dr. and Mrs. HERBERT L. BUR= 
RELL, 

Boston, Mass. 



April, 1893. 
H. H. RAQAN, 



Syracuse, N. Y, 



April, 1893. 
M. Q. HEINEY, 



Jacksonville, III. 



April, 1893. 
J. S. HYDE, 



Titusville, Pa, 



April, 1893. 

PAUL C. OSCANYAN, 

New York City. 



JAMES I. MANSON, 

floqui, Ariz, 



April, 1893. 
J. T. HERNDON, 



Franklin, Ky. 



May 10, 1893. 
J. W. ARNOTT, 

Beverley, England. 

Arrived May isth; descended into the 
canon this day. 



66 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



May //, 1893. 

B. W. CLOWD, 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Arrived May 1 6th; descended partway 
into canon; met Mr. John Hance and Mr. 
Arnott returning. Ascended with them, 
and had a pleasant conversation for an 
hour in Mr. Hance's cottage. Exchanged 
a five dollar gold piece for an English 
sovereign at a point where man never 
before passed money. 



May, 1893. 

H. H. WATKINS, 



May, 1893. 
L. WATKINS, 



Philadelphia. 



Chicago. 



WM. VERNON BOOTH, 

Chicago, III, 



WILLIAfl B. DOWD, 



New York. 



May 18, 1893. 

MARSHALL H. HALLORY, 
ROLLAND HALLORY, 

New York 

r**^^^*.^***/-**^**;-**^*^^ 

May 20, 1893. 

J. W. DOUBLEDAY, 

Jamestown, New York, 



May 20, 1893. 
C. WALLIS, 



Edgbasten, England. 



May 20, 1893. 
C. WALLIS. 

Having visited the principal points of 
interest in Europe, as well as in America, 
I would say that I have seen nothing like 
the Grand Canon of the Colorado for 
grandeur and for its unique views. 



May 20, 1893. 
J. W. DOUBLEDAY. 

Having gone down the canon to the 
winter cabin of Mr. Hance, I must say 
that the canon changes to the view at 
every few hundred feet, and the small 
hillocks that open from the rim change to 
mountains as you go down. 



May 21, 1893. 

HUGO LANQEWITZ RIGA, 

Russland, Russia. 



June 2, 1893. 

HENRY T. FINCK AND WIFE. 

Doubtless the most unique sight in the 
world, and the greatest possible surprise 
is to walk up from these tents to the edge 
of the canon to realize the full depth of 
the canon. The visitor should look at it 
from the rim on the point just this side of 
Point Bissell. The morning light is best 
from that position, while from the station 
the best hours are 4 to 7 P.M. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



6 9 



June 8, 1893. 

J. W. FLAVELLE, 

To river and BisselPs Point. 



London. 



June n, 1893. 

FREDERICK DIRNBURG, 

Berliner Tageblatt, 

Berlin, Germany. 
Dr. ERNEST H. VON HALLE, 

Hamburg, Germany. 
BERNHARD DERBURG, 

Berlin, Germany. 
Dr. PHIL ALWIN VICTOR, 

Germany. 

HAX TELIGER, 

Berlin, Germany. 
HANS TELIGER, 

Berlin, Germany. 

Party of German Editors and Artists. 



June 14, 1893. 

J. H. TOLFREE, 
Mrs. J. H. TOLFREE, 

flojave, Cal. 



June //, 1893. 

W. S. BARTLETT, 

Santa Ana, Cal. 

The grandeur of the Grand Canon of 
the Colorado River rivals, if it does not 
exceed, that of the Yosemite Valley. 



June 18, 1893. 

S. L. COX AND WIFE, 

Webb City, Mo. 
C. F. COX, 

Carthage, flo. 



W. J. GREGG AND WIFE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 
WM. SAWYER, 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 

All went to river on the i7th. Spent 
night at cabin, and returned to rim morn- 
ing of i8th. 



June 27, 1893. 

Rev. SELAH BROWN. 

Left July i, 1893. 

-^^XN^N^\-^N^N^\XN 

July 7, 1893. 

HERMAN JOHANSSON, 

Stockholm, Sweden. 

The greatest sight I have ever seen. 



July 4, 1893. 

Mrs. J. H. TOLFREE. 

VXX^V^N-X^X^s-^N-X^X-> 

July 4, 1893. 

L. E. CHITTENDEN, 

flojave, Cal. 

Went to the river July 4th; returned 
July 5th. Had a most glorious time. 
Will never forget my Fourth of July in 
the canon. It is one of the grandest 
sights in the world. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



July 5, i8 93 . 

J. J. SHAUfl, 

1744 Market St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

I fully agree with the above, and desire 
to register this statement that a pleasant 
lady adds much to the enjoyment of the 
trip. 



July 5, 1893. 

L. E. CHITTENDEN, 

Mojave, Cal. 

After ascending from the winter cabin 
this A.M., Mr. Hance returned, leaving 
the rim at 10:40, and reaching the winter 
cabin 11:05, making the descent of 3,300 
feet three miles in twenty-eight min- 
utes. He immediately returned to the 
rim, arriving at 12:10, being sixty-two 
minutes for the ascent, and one hour and 
thirty minutes for the entire trip. Con- 
sidering the ground over which this six 
miles extend, it was a wonderful trip. I 
timed and witnessed the descent and 
ascent from the rim. 



July 5, 1893. 

wn. SATORI, 



Yankton, Dakota. 



July 5, 1893. 

BEN P. HOOKE, Jr. 

Logsville, Pa, 



July 6, 1893. 

QEO. WHITFIELD, 

Wimbledon, England. 

Arrived July 5th; left July nth. Bathed 
in the Colorado River July 6th. 

July 10, 1893. 

Mr. and firs. WM. DOWNS, 

Brooklyn, New York. 

Enjoyed very much the visit. Went 
down to the river, which, under Hance's 
lead, is well worth the labor. 

July II, 1893, 

Dr. QUSTAV BRUHL, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

July ii, 1893. 

JOS. B. VERCAHP, 

Mrs. JOSEPH B. VERCAMP, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

July n, 1893. 

firs. D. BABBITT, 
RAYflOND BABBITT, 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 

July 14, 1893. 
J. A. LEONARD, 

Youngstqwn, Ohio. 

The Grand Canon, a great gulf of pale 
blue transparent ether in which is sub- 
merged unspeakable sublimity and inde- 
scribable beauty. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



July 14, 1893. 

DIETRICH KREHICRLT, 

Augsburg, Germany. 
C. GRAF BLUCHER, 

Berlin, Germany. 

All went to the river. 

^^~^r^r^^^r^r~~^^r^r^ 

July 24, i8 93 . 

EUGENE A. HILL, 

Wichita, Kan, 

^^^^^f-^^-^jr-^r^^r^ 

July 25, 1893. 

MATHIAS YOST, 

Santa Ana, Orange County, 
California. 

^x-^\_^xx-\_/-\-''^ 

July 25, 1893. 

F. H. LUNGREEN, 

U.S. 

J ^ s ^^v_^S_XN_X^X^^^-^V^^V-*^V^' 

July 25, 1893. 

J. H. HICKS, 

N. M. 

XV^N^S^^^X^XN^XN^^N^^N^^*, 

July 25, 1893. 

GERTRUDE KETCHUM, 
FRANCIS KETCHUfl, 

Chicago, 111, 



July 25, 1893. 

WALLACE FORD, 



Dallas, Texas. 



July 25, 1893. 

fir. and Mrs. FRANK H. SCOTT, 
BERTRAM DELAFIELD SCOTT, 
flARION STURGES SCOTT, 

Chicago, 111. 



C. J. SPELLHIRE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



DANIEL DONAVAN, 



J. E. EDWARDS, 



Chicago, III, 



N. C, 



KATHARINE EDWARDS, 

California, 



CHAS. EDWARDS, 
MAUD M. EDWARDS, 

Santa Ana, Cal. 



firs. A. H. SPELLMIRE, 

K. C.,Mo, 



ALPHONSO SPELLMIRE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

_x-S^^^^N-^N^-s^-V 

ELEANOR SPELLHIRE, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



July, 1893. 

JAMES HAUXHURST, 
ELLA E. HAUXHURST, 
ADELE HAUXHURST, 
C. W. SIRCH, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



Mr. and firs. JOHN DAVIS, 

Camp Verde, Ariz, 



SHARLOT M. HALL, 

Lynx Creek, Ariz, 



July, 1893. 

V. E. MESSINGER, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 



July, 1893. 

ROBERT F. GARNETT, 
Cor. Van Buran and Pinal Sts., 
Phoenix, Arizona, 



August 2, 1893. 

A. BRUCE, 

England. 

V^-V-^-^X^-^^X^-^^-^-N-X^^^N^^V^ 1 

August 2, 1893. 

ARTHUR RICflERSCHIER, 

Hunchen, Bavaria. 



August 2, 1893. 

KAREL L. DORDRECHT, 

Holland. 



August 2, 1893. 
A. V. STOLK, 



Rotterdam. 



August 2, 1893. 
G. ELPEN, 



Munchen, Bavaria. 



August 2, 1893. 

C. TAUFKIRCHEN, 

Munchen, Bavaria. 



Prof. T. SINGER, 

Vienna, Austria. 



Dr. KARflER, 



B. BUISSON, 



Germany. 



France. 



W. M. CLAYPOOL, 

El Paso, Texas, 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



73 



J. W. WOOD, 

Los Angeles Times. 

Almighty Jove, Thy wondrous hand 
hath carved with skill this canon grand. 



Wfl. H. BANKS, 



England. 



JOHN H. DAWSON, 

San Francisco, Cal 



J. S. HUTCHISON, 
Hiss K. T. HUTCHISON, 
E. C. HUTCHISON, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
LINCOLN HUTCHISON, 
JAMES S. HUTCHISON, 

Harvard. 
Made to canon and back in 12 hours. 

>-\>^X^^^>^^^XX^%^Xx-N^ 

September, 1893. 

MATTISON W. CHASE, 

Ogdensburg, New York. 

Nature's masterpiece is what I call the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado. Why 
Americans will go to Europe and around 
the world, where they can see nothing to 
equal it, before they have looked upon 
this marvelous spectacle in their own 
land, I cannot imagine. On September 
1 2th I made the trip, with guide, from the 
rim down Hance trail to the river, and 
returned, in eleven hours; but I would 
advise any one else of average strength 
and endurance to take the usual two days 
for the trip. 



L. WATTS AND WIFE, 
A. WATTS, 

London. 

Had a most enjoyable trip. Mr. Hance 
is most anxious I should mention the fact 
that we all went to the river. Slept two 
nights at the rock cabin. 



Mrs. W. A. CLARK, 
firs. K. L. CLARK, 

New York City. 
C. W. CLARK, 

Butte, Montana. 

We enjoyed the beautiful scenery from 
BisselPs Point as well as from the river's 
banks. It is an enjoyable trip. 



O. Q. SONECK, 



New York. 



Dr. BERVERDAY, 

Hanover, Germany. 



October z, 1893. 

Rev. Father ALFRED QUETU, 

Parish Priest. 

Prescott, A. T. 



October 7, 1893. 
Rev. Father FELIX DILLY, 
Parish Priest, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



74 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



October i, 1893. 

Rev. THOS. C. MOFFETT, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



October i, 1893. 

Hon. E. Q. F. HORN, 

Prescott, Arizona. 



October i, 

M. J. DORAN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



October 

A. H. SPELLIRE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^~\ 

October 2, 1893. 

firs. WALLACE, 
WM. WALLACE, 
MARGARET WALLACE, 
LORA BELL WALLACE, 
CORA LOVELL, 
LILLIE LOVELL, 
CLARA CALKINS, 
A. JOHNSTON, 
W. H. ASHURST, 
M. M. ASHURST, 
E. J. ASHURST, 
ANDREW ASHURST, 
CHAS. ASHURST, 

All of Flagstaff, Arizona, 



October 4, 1893. 

J. CLAUD BILLINQSLEA, 

Chicago, 111, 



October 4., 1893. 

J. H. MEANS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



October 4^ 1893. 

IVAN QUILK, 

Budapest, Hungary. 



October 4, 1893. 

LORDISLAS DE FOQER, 

Budapest, Hungary, 



October 4, 1893. 
BARO B. QASTAS, 



October 4, 1893. 
MIRR BERG, 



Hungary. 



Hungary, 



October 4, 1893. 
JULIA C. PATTERSON, 



London. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



77 



October 4, 1893. 

CHAS. W. K. LEOSER, 

New York, 

s-^s^s~*^^-s^ 

October 4, 1893. 

BYRAN E. WOODCOCK, 

Pennsylvania. 



October 4, 1893. 
CHAS. B. HcCOY, 



Needle*, Cal. 



October 10, 1893. 

J. EDWARD BLAVEL, 

Alameda, Cal. 

The World's Fair at Chicago is the 
greatest wonder of the age. The Grand 
Canon of the Colorado the greatest won- 
der of all ages. 

October 10, 1893. 

R. W. SCHOPPER, 

Zerlenroda, Russia. 



October 10, 1893. 
JOHN COLSHURN, 



Langenberg. 



October 26, 1893. 

L. de BUYQENON, 

Liege, Belgique. 

After having visited the Yellowstone 
Park, seen Oregon State and Washington 



State, Cascade Range, Mt. Tacoma, Mt. 
Bather, Mt. Shasta, and Sierra Nevada 
Mountains, California, and the lovely 
Yosemite Valley, I declare I did not see 
in America a scenery more or as strik- 
ingly wonderful and impressive and sub- 
lime as the Grand Canon of the Colorado. 
In Europe, I do not remember I have 
ever seen anything by which I have been 
as impressed except, perhaps, by the 
splendid White Mount at Chamoise, when 
I saw it for the first time fifteen years 
ago. 



October 31, 1893. 

L. H. TOLFREE, 
Mrs. L. H. TOLFREE, 
EDITH M. TOLFREE, 
GERTRUDE TOLFREE, 

All of Flagstaff, Ariz. 
Departed from canon October 31, 1893. 

^^^XN-^^^-^^-N^'X-^^X^^^^^XX^^X^^^ 

November 25, 1893. 

Left New York City, November isth, 
en route to California, but my suspicion 
of the grandeur of the country compelled 
me to stop off at Flagstaff. The time of 
the year for a trip to the canon was any- 
thing but safe, considering the lateness of 
the year, cold weather, and idea of being 
snowed in, but, nevertheless, our trip was 
without events of any mention until the 
night of our arrival at Captain John 
Hance's, when a terrific snow-storm set 
in. It lasted until morning. The wind 
at the present time is blowing a gale, and 
how we will find it on our return is a 
question. Must trust to Providence for 
a safe return. The kind hospitality shown 
us by Captain John Hance will never be 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



forgotten. During this writing we are all 
sitting around the fire. To compare the 
grandeur of this canon is beyond my 
power. I can hardly believe my eyes, 
and must say every one that goes sight- 
seeing should never forget the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado. 

Sincerely yours, 
E. T. PAHMENBERQ, New York. 



Close of visiting record for year 
1893. 



April j, 1894. 

WM. C. WILKINSON, 
Prof, of Poetry. 

University, Chicago. 

^~- 

April 6, 1894. 

THOS. BOYNTON, F. S. A. 

Bridlington Quay, England. 

Indescribably grand. 



April 8, 
L. B. HICKOK, 

Troy Grove, La Salle Co., 111. 

Words will not describe the Grand 
Canon. 



April 8, 1894. 

QEO. W. HANCE, 

Yavapai County, Ariz. 



April 24, 1894. 

HERBERT B. TURNER, 
Mrs. HERBERT B. TURNER, 
ANNE TRACY TURNER, 
flARY BEACH TURNER, 



April 24, 1894. 

ROSALIE DELAFIELD FLOYD, 
22 Williams St., 
New York City. 



April 24, 1894. 

WALTER H. CRITTENDEN, 

New York City 



D. O. WICKHAM AND WIFE, 
No. I Broadway, 
New York. 



April 26, 1894. 

HERBERT M. TOLFREE, 

Buffalo, N. Y, 

^^^r^^^^r^,^^^ 

April 26, 1894. 
A. G. HUBBARD AND WIFE, 
Redlands, Cal, 

Left May 5, 1894. 

^^^/^^/^^r^^r^^r^/^^/^^^^ 

May 2, 1894. 
Mrs. EDHON WRIGHT, 
Miss BESSIE WRIGHT, 
JOHN CASTLE WRIGHT. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



79 



May 2, 
GEO. D. B. DARBY, 

Philadelphia, Penn. 



May 5, 1894. 
WILLIAM Q. DeWITT, 

New York City. 

One of the greatest wonders of the 
canon is the cliff called "Hance's Leap," 
not generally known. The mountain-sheep 
got away and crossed the Colorado. Un- 
cle John will give all details, as he is the 
sole survivor in these parts. 



May 7, 1894. 
Miss GERTIE KETCHUM. 

\^N-^N fc X\/X/XX\XN^\>' 

May 7, 1894. 
ROBERT CURTIS. 



May 7, 1894. 

EUGENE A. SLIKER. 



May n, 

JOHN H. TRENT, 

Brooklyn, New York. 



May ii, 1894. 
Dr. ELBERT WING, 



Chicago. 



May n, 1894. 

FRANK H. SCOTT, 
BERTRAM SCOTT, 



Chicago. 



May n, 1894. 

Miss ELIZA V. RUMSEY, 

Chicago, 

y-^XN^^^^N^^XX^X^X^^X-^X^-^%^^V.^N^^N^^> 

May ii, 1894. 

Miss MARY D. STURGES, 
Miss ROSALIE STURGES, 
GEO. STURGES, 

Chicago, 

^^-^~^~^j~^r^r^r 

May ii, 1894. 

W. F. DUMMER, 
Mrs. W. F. DUMMER, 

Chicago. 



May 11, 1894. 
F. H. LUNGREEN, 



Cincinnati. 



May n, 1894. 

JOHN H. HICKS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 

^^>^^^^>^^^^^^^~^^^ 

May ii, 1894. 

GERTIE KETCHUn, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 



8o 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



May n, 1894. 

F. C. REID, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 

^*.s^r<**s~**s~**~s*s^^ 

May n, 1894. 

STANTON CURTIS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 

May u, 1894. 
Hiss BLANCH METZ, 



Cincinnati. 



May ii, 1894. 
Miss VERKAMP, 



Cincinnati. 



May ii, 1894. 

WAI. BABBITT, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^X^-V^N^-^X-V^^X-^X^X-V^^X XV . x-vx- ~^>~^J~ ^X-^x- 

May n, 1894. 

N. A. CAflERON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

m^-^^^^^^^^^^,^^^^^ 

May n, 1894. 

JOHN TOLER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^^^^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

May n, 1894. 

WALLACE FORD, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



May n, 1894. 

FRANK KETCHUfl, 

Flagstaff, Arizona, 



May n, 1894. 
E. A. SLIKER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



May 12, 
Mrs. W. H. STEVENS, 
MARY fl. STEVENS, 

Both of Detroit, Mich. 



May 12, 1894. 

PERCIVAL HENDERSON, 

El Paso, Texas. 



May 12, 1894. 
JAMES SUYDAM, 
LAMBERT SUYDAM, 
JED. FRYE, 

All of New York City. 



May, 1894. 
CHAS. W. PALMIE. 



May, 1894. 
HEINRICH VOGEL, 

Dresden, Germany, 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



June i, 

Mrs. SUMNER BABCOCK, 
SUflNER BABCOCK. 

Arrived June ist at Moran's Point; 
Sunset, June 2d; June 3d, down the 
Grand Canon to the river, by the way of 
Red Canon and Lauras Gorge. Time 
from river to rim, three and a half hours. 
No language can describe the grandeur of 
the trip. June 5th, en route to the Yo- 
semite Valley and Yellowstone Park. 



June 4, 1894. 

SAM HUBBARD, Jr., 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Where Alph, the sacred river, ran through 

caverns measureless to man, 
Down to a sunless sea, 
Take the wild imagination of Coleridge, 
Take the wonderful masterpieces of Dore, 
Yet, neither poet nor painter has ever con- 
ceived this sublime reality. 



June 20, 

C. L. BINGHAM, 



Chicago, 111. 



June 23, 1894. 

J. M. CONNELL, 
Mrs. J. M. CONNELL, 
Master RAYMOND CONNELL, 
FRANCIS CONNELL, 

Chicago, 



June 23, 

Hiss EDITH LOCKELT, 



Chicago, 



June 23, 1894. 

E. WELLS KILOQQ, 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 



June 23, 1894. 

W. H. PICKERING, 

Cambridge, Mass, 



June 23, 1894. 

A. E. DOUGLASS, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



June 23, 1894. 

CHAS. G. SLACK, 

Marietta, Ohio, 



July 18, 1894. 
B. C. HOCK, 



Flagstaff, Arizona. 



July 18, 1894. 

GEO. H. SICREST, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



82 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



July 18, 1894. 

BERRY J. BOSTWICK, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



July 18, 1894.. 
J. H. POLITZER, 



Phoenix, A. T. 



July 18, 1894. 
J. S. BURTON, 



Phoenix, A. T. 



July 18, 1894. 

J. T. SPANGLER, 



Phoenix, A. T. 



August 9, 1894. 
P. B. McCABE, 



Phoenix, A. T. 



Words are inadequate to describe the 
sublimity of a sunset view of the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado, and should be 
counted among the Seven Wonders of 
ihe world. 



September 9, 1894, 
J. DOYLE. 



New York. 



September 9, 1894 
C. S. SARGENT, 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



September 9, 1894. 
J. W. TOURMEY, 



Tucson, A. T, 



September 15, 1894. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. GOUCHER, 
Carthage, Ho. 

September 21, 1894. 
Mrs. E. H. CHASE, 

New York City, N. Y. 

September 21, 1894. 
Dr. A. I. BOUFFLEUR, 
Miss GRACE F. BOUFFLEUR, 
Chicago. 

September 21, 1894. 

C. H. FANCHER, 

Land Agt. A. P. R. R. 
HATTIE W. FANCHER, 
GRACE FANCHER, 
WARD FANCHER, 

Albuq., N. M. 

We all went down the new trail on 
September 2ist to the river, starting 
about 8 A.M., and returned about 7 P.M., 
riding horseback nearly all the way. 

September 28, 1894. 
B. N. FREEMAN, 
Mrs. B. N. FREEMAN, 
Miss HELEN FREEMAN, 

Denver, Colorado. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



September 28, 1894. 

W. O. COLE, 

Miss BLANCH E. COLE, 

Chicago, III. 



September 28, 1894. 
Hiss FORD, 



Boston, Mass. 



October 7, 1894. 

5. F. flEGUIRE, 

Mrs. S. F. flEGUIRE, 

ALVIE HEGUIRE, 

Little FRANKIE MEGUIRE, 

Wn. G. BAILEY, 

fliss LEOTIA STONE, 

Jerome, Ariz. 

Visited Grand Canon via Hance's new 
trail. 



Novembers, 1894. 
D. T. BRAINARD, 
First Lieut. 2d Cavalry, U. S. 
Army. 



November 12^ 1894. 
D. K. FITZHUGH, 

Special Examiner Pension Bureau, 
Washington, D. C. 

To Grand Canon and back this day, on 
foot, and I will never forget it. Went to 
river, via Hance's New Trail. The grand- 
est sight in the world. 



November 16, 1894. 
J. H. STEVENSON. 

My only regret is that John Hance and 
I can't make a longer stop at the boss 
ditch of the world. 



March 1 
R. K. WILLIS, 

Lewis Centre, Delaware Co., 
Ohio. 

I wish to say that I have seen a good 
deal of this great and beautiful land of 
ours, and calling on the great God that 
made all these beautiful sights, I wish 
to say that right here on the ranch owned 
by John Hance is the greatest sight in 
the world, and I want all my friends on 
earth to come and enjoy the sights and 
his open heart and hospitality. 



March 19, i$95- 
NEWTON CHALKER, 

Akron, Ohio. 

I have spent two days very pleasantly 
visiting the Grand Canon of the Colorado, 
and enjoying the accommodations at the 
inn of John Hance, and enjoyed both 
hugely. 



April 18, 1895. 
JAS. N. BETHUNE, 



Los Angeles. 



86 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



April 18, 1895. 
HUGH J. LEE, 
E. P. TOBIE, Jr., 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

We, Us and Company went from 
Hance's cabin to the river and returned 
in four and a quarter hours. 



Denver, Colo. 



April 27, 1895. 
H. P. SPENCER, 

Simply indescribable. 

'^v-^N^* k- xs>^\^XX>^*\/XX^x 

April 27, 1895. 

C. O. HALL, 

Conway, Iowa. 

Editor Journal. 

After a two days' visit to the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado is all that it is 
represented to be, and more, too. No 
language can fully describe, no artist 
paint the beauty, grandeur, immensity 
and sublimity of this most wonderful pro- 
duction of Nature's great architect. It 
must be seen to be appreciated. 



April 30, 1895. 

W. WEST DURANT, 

New York. 

It is presumption to attempt to express 
in mere words the impression made upon 
one by the Grand Canon of the Colorado, 
even after viewing it more than once. It 
must be seen to be understood and even 
in part appreciated. 



April 30, 1895. 
L. N. STOTT, 



Stottville, N. M. 



The only part of the canon I feel I have 
seen is Mr. Hance's trail. Any one who 
does not take the trip down into the canon 
misses the grandest part of that little part, 
which you can see in three days' time. 



May 7, 1895. 
TILLIE VERKAMP. 



May 7, 1895. 

CLARA WESSEL. 



May 7, 1895. 
I. H. W. 

Drink Condit and Mercur's Orange 
Cider. 



May 20, 1895. 
CLARENCE M. SMITH, 

54 Wall St., N. Y. 

The Grand Canon is simply sublime. 
A trip should be made down Captain 
Hance's trail to the river, but the traveler 
must keep his helm hard-a-port. My 
personal experience in a jaunt to the 
river and returning in one day, bids me 
quote Virgil's description of a visit to 
Hades, of which he says: Facilis Averno 
descensus est ; Sed redder e. (That 's the 
rub.) 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



May 31, 1895. 

Miss WHITLOCK, 
Mrs. WHITLOCK. 

You may talk of this and that point and 
view, but give us the Hance Point, with 
shifting clouds and sun playing at hide- 
and-seek over Santa Fe* Temple. 



Grand Canon, June 5, 1895. 
Mrs. MARY E. HART, AL D., 
Los Angeles. 

There is a certain malady, commonly 
termed "big head," with which a large 
number of otherwise healthy people are 
afflicted. 

Prescription: Stand upon the brink of 
the Grand Canon, gaze down, and still 
further down, into its awful depths, and 
realize for the first time your own utter 
insignificance. 



June 9, 1895. 

W. B. THOMAS, 

Los Angeles. 

I have seen what is without doubt the 
grandest natural wonder in the world, the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado, and I have 
also seen enough to convince me that no 
man or woman should attempt to make 
the trip to the river a-foot. If you can't 
go on a horse, don't go. 



June 9, 1895. 

T. S. VAN DYKE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

All it is said to be, and the trail one of 
the safest I have ever seen. 



June n, 1895. 
J. H. TOLFREE, 

If the mountains of the earth were 
leveled off and dumped into the Grand 
Canon of the Colorado at this point, 
there would not be a trail wide enough 
for a thoroughbred Indian to cross upon. 



June 12, 1895. 
TESSA L. KELSO, 

A better thing than writing in John 
Hance's book is riding down John 
Hance's trail to the river. 



June 14, 1895. 

RUE H. HARDENBERG, 

Magnificent, and much else also in 
addition besides. 



June 14, 1895. 

ALFRED P. GRIFFITH, 

Azusa, Cal. 

The grandest sight of my life, and far 
above possible anticipation, but Captain 
Hance's double-breasted tea can't be 
surpassed. 



June 14, 1895. 

EFFIE B. GRIFFITH, 

Rushville, 111. 

My first horseback ride or any stage. 
I took the canon trip on Captain Hance's 
horse Dick, and am alive to tell the tale. 
I can never forget what I have seen. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



Grand Canon, June 16, 1895. 
HARRY T. CORY, C. E., 

Columbia, Mo. 

Yesterday I went with Captain Hance 
to the river. It certainly was the ex- 
perience of my life. One really has 
never seen the canon until he has gone 
down the trail to the river. After that 
trip he will certainly agree with me that 
the canon is the most awful, horrible 
thing ever conceived of, and for heaven's 
sake don't go alone nor walk. To save 
money by walking, or going alone, is the 
worst way of saving money I can con- 
ceive of. If you do save money (falsely, 
so called,) just read this when you get 
back, and remember that I told you so. 



July 17, 1895. 

JOHN W. SEARQEANT, 

Mrs. W. F. SEARQEANT AND 
CHILDREN, 

Marshall, flo. 



July 23, i8 95 . 

ED. B. CULLINAM, 

372 W. Seventh, St. 
Cincinnati, O. 



EZRA J. WARNER, Jr., 

Chicago, 111, 



JOSEPH E. Z. HUNT, 
Honolulu, 

Hawaiian Islands. 



JOHN HUNTER STEARNS, 

Chicago, HI. 



July 29, 

H. H. PRUGH, 
CARRIE M. PRUGH, 

Dayton, Ohio. 

This is our fourth day here. Have 
been down the new trail with John 
Hance, and made various excursions 
along the rim. We feel that we have 
only commenced to realize the unspeak- 
able sublimity of the canon, and hope to 
come again when the railroad is built 
from Flagstaff. 



July 3 

ALDACE F. WALKER, 
KATHARINE WALKER, 
S. F. GILBERT, 
ROBERT WALKER, 
HAROLD WALKER, 

All of Chicago. 



August i, 
L. W. JOHNSON, 
GEO. BURGESS, 
W. E. GRAVES, 
CHAS. BURKHART, 
G. A. flcCLAFLIN, 
R. S. McCLAFLIN, 
J. G. AXLING, 
Mrs. R. S. McCLAFLIN, 
firs. GEO. IRWIN, 
Miss ORA RUFFCORN, 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



89 



Miss ANNIE STUMP, 
Miss LYDIA MORRIS, 
Miss MAGGIE TYNAN, 

Winslow, A. T. 



August i, 1895. 

CHAS E. BURKHART. 

Cooked for the Winslow party. 

Grand Canon, August 19, 1895. 
G. A. NEEFF. 

We have enjoyed everything, the 
faces, the characters, the meals, this 
book; last, but not least, ah! the canon. 
We have seen its faces, oh, so varied, 
somber, smiling, meditatingly, growling, 
ecstatic. To have seen the faces of the 
mountains and the depths is to have 
studied the thousand characters, and yet 
but to catch an inkling of its true worth. 
It is a book, this canon is, to the poetic 
soul, and with such convivial spirit about 
these venerable trees and kind, smiling 
faces at the camp, it is one of the most 
restful places imaginable. The canon 
itself is a picture of eternal rest. May the 
time soon come when many will enjoy the 
beauties of these God-given festivities. 



August 21, 1895. 

CHAS. A. BALEY, 

Oakland, Cal. 
WM. C. VAUGHAN, 

Chicago, 111. 

We made this day the ascent of Ayer's 
Peak. A flag was placed on the northern 
peak, one on the southern, and a monu- 



ment reared on the middle one. Ayer's 
Peak occupies a central position in the 
Grand Canon, from which are revealed 
such a touch of immensity and grandeur 
as to produce an indellible impression. 



August 22, 1895. 

CAROLINE HADLEY 

(Aged nine years). 

We have been to Moran Point, and we 
would like to go to the river, but I do not 
think we can. I think it is very, very deep, 
and grand, and that it must have taken a 
very long time to make it. I would like 
to stay here forever, it is so beautiful. 



Grand Canon, August 25, 1895. 

C. H. COBLE, 
L. L. FERRAL, 
T. B. BELL, 
F. D. MYERS, 
J. M. AITKEN. 

Bicycle party. 

Bell, Myers and Aitken made the trip 
over the Hance trail on foot. Time, from 
head of trail to river, two hours and 
twenty-five minutes; rested two hours, 
and made the head of the trail in four 
hours and fifteen minutes. 



August 30, 

I. T. WHITTEnORE, 

Florence, Arizona. 

The longings of my heart have been 
gratified. My anticipations and expecta- 
tions more than realized. I look in won- 



9 o 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



der, love, and admiration at this mightiest 
of God's created works, but never have I 
felt so small, and God so great, as while 
standing, awe-struck and overwhelmed, 
as in gazing on this, the greatest of all 
earthly wonders. I cannot leave, how- 
ever, without leaving my testimony of 
respect for the man who made the trail, 
and made it possible for all sight-seers to 
see the canon from crest to base. All 
honor to friend John Hance. 



Grand Canon, August Ji, 1895. 
EDITH MANSFIELD. 

Doubtless, God might have made some- 
thing more wonderful or more magnifi- 
cent, but, doubtless, he never did. Amer- 
ica for Americans. I am glad to add my 
meed, respect, and admiration for the 
enterprise and determination which made 
the trail possible. 



August ji, 1895. 

MARIAN SCOTT FRANKLIN. 

A vision of what God has prepared for 
us in the New Jerusalem. 



August 31, 1895. 

HOWARD MARINE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Views from Moran's and Bissell's 
Points are the finest you will see, and go 
down the trail, and you will know the 
depth of the canon by experience. 



August jr, 
Miss flAYBEL MYERS, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 



August jf, 1895. 
Miss NARY SMITH, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



August j/, 1895. 
JOHN Y. T. SMITH. 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

To Mr. John Hance: 

My Old Friend: I am delighted to meet 
you on the rim of the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado River, after a score or more of 
years since our last meeting. 



August 31, 1895. 
Miss WINIFRED SMITH, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



August ji, 1895. 

EDWIN E. CARROLL, 

Lawrence, Kan. 



September 19, 1895. 

R. F. COBLE, 
B. D. GOBLE, 
O. K. CUSHINQ. 

The canon is here to show for itself, and 
Captain Hance will show it to you. 




A COMMODIOUS TENT, GRAND CANON. 




INTERIOR OF SAME. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



September, 19, 1895. 

Dr. ARTHUR KORN, 

Munich, Germany. 



September 20, 1895. 
Mrs. J. M. AITKIN, 
J. A. EVERTS, 
Q. A. DUTCHER, 
E. W. DUTCHER, M. D. 
All of Whipple Barracks, Arizona. 
Beautiful Grand Canon. 



September 20, 1895. 
HUGO FROMHOLZ, 

Berlin, Germany. 

Visited the canon, went only half way 
down the trail, but was fully satisfied of 
that. Point Moran pleased me best. 



September 25, 
W. E. PEDRICK, 

Denver, Colo. 

On the trail to the river, about half an 
hour's march from a point opposite Point 
Moran to the right of the trail among 
cedars, and about one hundred yards 
distant from the trail, rises a projecting 
rock, upon whose side I noticed to-day 
what appeared from the trail upon the 
face of the rock to be some kind of rep- 
tile, coiled in circles, over a space about 
four feet long. I had no time to visit it 
to-day, and hope some geological stu- 
dent will make a close examination, and 
hope a classification may be arrived at. 



September 26, 1895. 
Dr. G. SOHWATHE, 



Germany, 



September 2j, 1895. 
WM. MARTIA AIKEN, 

Supervising Architect, 
Treasury Department, 
Washington, D. C. 



October i, 

FRED J. MADDEN, 

Clinton, Iowa. 
EDITH M. TOLFREE, 
GERTRUDE TOLFREE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 
PORTER FLEMING, 

Phoenix, A. T. 
CHAS. S. FLEMfllNG, 

Stanford University. 

Grand Canon survey party. 

We all expect to see the Grand Canon 
from the windows of a palace-car next 
year. "Dude," the jack-rabbit police- 
dog, kept us in game. 



Chicago. 



October i, 
WILL B. HUNTER, 



Wonderful canon, 

Child of the seas, 

No man knows thy history, 

None can solve thy mystery; 

God-given glimpse of eternity 

To weak humanitv. 



94 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



October 7, 1895. 

Dr. P. Q. CORNISH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

F. H. NEWHAN, 
W. B. HUNTER, 
W. F. TALIAFERRO, 

Albuquerque, N. M. 

E. A. SLIKER, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Captain C. E. HOWARD 

Cycling party. 



October 7, 1895. 

The Arizona Mission Conference of the 
M. E. Church, by arrangements of Rev. 
B. M. Danforth, Pastor of the M. E. 
Church at Flagstaff, visited the Grand 
Canon. All agreed that the trip was the 
event of a lifetime. The party was com- 
posed of the following persons: 

Bishop HENRY W. WARREN, 
Denver, Colo. 

G. F. BOVARD, 

Supt. Arizona Mission. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

C. J. CHASE AND WIFE, 

Pastor at Phoenix, A. T. 

G. F. PIERENAUD, 

Pastor at Prescott, A. T. 

ED. DEARBORN AND WIFE, 

Pastor at Alhambra, A. T. 

DAVID ROBERTS, 

Pastor Tombstone, A. T. 

B. M. DANFORTH, 

Pastor Flagstaff, A. T. 

Mrs. HUNT, 

Glendale, Arizona. 



The Hisses AMY and DAISY DAN= 

FORTH, 
WILL DANFORTH, 

Family of the pastor at Flagstaff. 

We all agree that the Grand Canon is 
the greatest thing on earth of its kind, 
and heartily endorse the entire manage- 
ment, including the Grand Canon Stage 
Company, the hotel management, and 
will not soon forget our guide, Captain 
John Hance. 



Friday, October 25, 1895. 
CHAS. P. BOND, 

Boston, Mass., and 
Waltham, Mass. 

A single day has given me only a 
glimpse of this marvelous creation of 
Nature. That glimpse has, however, 
been a revelation to me. I have seen all 
the wonders of the New World that com- 
mand the admiration of man, but I regard 
this Grand Canon of the Colorado River 
as the grandest of them all. One of God's 
masterpieces, its grandeur, its marvel- 
ous groupings of Nature's pinnacles, and 
its vast extent, is beyond the grasp of 
human intellect to comprehend, and be- 
yond the power of human language to 
accurately picture. No pen or pencil can 
portray its awful grandeur. It is a kaleido- 
scope of Nature's greatest beauties, fur- 
nishing new surprises and new wonders 
from every point of view. It well de- 
serves a place in the galaxy of the great 
wonders of the world; climate, country, 
people, and surroundings, all combine, 
to make this Grand Canon of the Colo- 
rado River one of the ideal spots on the 
American Continent. A place where one 
must always love to come, and from 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



95 



which he goes with much reluctance. It 
is a place where man must feel, if he 
never felt it before, the existence of a 
Creator, in whose presence he is as 
nothing, and whose ways are past 
understanding. 



Beginning of the season, April 
1896. 



April 15 , 1896. 

E. A. SLIKER, 
C. H. COBLE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

The Coconino Cycling Club. 

The first cyclers of the season. We all 
expect to see the canon from the seat of a 
flat or hand-car next year. 

Lovingly yours, 

E. A. SLIKER. 

April 2 'j>, 1896, 

Mr. and firs. W. D. ELLIS, 

New York City, N. Y. 



April 2 

HARRY FIRVE, 

Albuquerque, N. H. 

I have been here two days, and never 
had so much fun since I had the measles. 



May 1 

J. M. CASSIN, 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 

If to see the Grand Canon for a day or 



two is so great a pleasure, what must it 
be to view it daily for years ? John Hance 
alone can tell. 



May 12, 1896. 

ARTHUR L,. SHOLL, 

General Office, P. R. R., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

I made the trip over the new trail be- 
tween the hours of 8 A.M. and 5 P.M., 
spending an hour at the river. The most 
magnificent walk of my life; but I wish 
to say to others who may wish to walk, 
take our respected friend's advice, a 
word to the wise is sufficient. 



May 12, 1896. 

Dr. S. A. KNOPF. 

To Mr. Hance I wish a few gold- 
mines and many years of health and 
happiness besides. 



June 19, 1896. ^p.m. 
CHAS. WM. SIRCH, 

flilwaukee, Wis. 

Left morning 23d of June 1896. 

IMPRESSION i. 
After the drive, a view, a 

Sight of the Canon grande", 
Regrets of the wearisome drive 

To this corner of the land; 
The scene I admit is rugged, 

But should I seek the course, 
When around me are beautiful moun- 
tains, 

Already I feel remorse, 



9 6 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF TFTE 



'T is not half so big as I expected. 

Oh thoroughly I despise 
The travelers who exaggerate, 

Especially as to size. 

IMPRESSION II. 

A supper, well-served and hot, 

Quite cures a man of the blues, 
A sleep in a cool, sweet cot 

Full many regrets subdues. 
A breakfast, two burros, a guide, 

A descent from the canon's rim, 
I cared not to explore the canon, 

But just to be company to him, 
My friend, the Professor, from Kansas. 

Afoot I descend the trail. 

IMPRESSION III. 

At eight we are found well-started; 

At ten we did not fail 
To drink at the old stone cabin; 

At eleven the ladders descend; 
At twelve we have reached the river, 

Down at the canon's end. 

IMPRESSION IV. 

A rest and a plunge in the river, 

And experience in quicksand. 
We felt of the current in places, 

'T would most take off one's hand; 
At three we prepared for the ascent; 

Scaled falls by ladders and ropes; 
I had walked seven miles to the river, 

But returning was most beyond hopes. 

IMPRESSION v. 
I can solve most difficult problems 

Theorems obscure can pass, 
But I frankly acknowledge in high arts 

Is vastly superior the ass. 

IMPRESSION VI. 

On I struggled, e'er seeking the higher; 
Anon I stopped in fright. 



An inch to the left, an inch to the right, 

And this page I 'd not indite. 
To appreciate, Oh traveler, 

This canon's awful height, 
You must ascend without burro, 

With your own strong brawn and might; 
For where there is no unit of measure 

To calculate the size, 
To man the extent of the labor 
Will atone for the failure of eyes. 

IMPRESSION VII. 

" Carpe diem," and do not fail 

To visit Moran's view, 
For though quite weary grows the trail, 

The grandeur will ne'er be forgotten by 
you. 

IMPRESSION VIII. 

Beautiful was the trip we made 
Down Cameron's trail and through the 

caves. 
Impressions of stratas and stalagmites 

will cling to my memory, and more 

I crave. 



June 19, 1896. 
J. CURTIS WASSON, A. B. 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Came to Grand Canon Hotel; got out 
of stage; walked over to rim of canon; 
looked out, and Oh!!! June 2oth, went 
down Hance's trail to river, took a bath 
in river, and returned. June 2ist, went 
to Moran's Point. June 22d, went down 
Cameron's trail; visited mines, and ex- 
plored three caves. 

Chasm of the Creator, 

Handiwork of His hand, 
And of His works none greater 

Is found in all the land. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



97 



Great, massive, awful abyss, 

Delving Pluto's artifice, 
To keep his realm obscure within, 

From upper worlds of wayward men. 

And to our host and hostess kind, 
And daughters fairest of mankind, 

Who added to our joy, 
We, friend Sirch and I 

Now say good-by, 
And hail our stage, ahoy! 

May heaven's pleasure, 

Without measure, 
E'er your way betide, 

That others coming, 
In the gloaming, 

May e'er in you confide. 



August I2> 1896. 
S. SOPHIA FRIEDLEY, 

Morristown, Pa. 



August 12, 

flARY C. STINSON, 

flcrristown, Pa. 



August 12, 1896. 

GERTRUDE HENDERSON, 

Montgomery, Pa, 



August 12, 1896. 

KATHARINE P. FRANCISCENS, 
Lewistown, Pa. 



August 12, 1896. 
ROBERT P. SHICK, 



Reading, Pa, 



August 12, 1896. 

Wfl. H. BEAN, 

First Lieut., Second Cavalry, U. S. A* 



August 12, 1896. 
WM. STOWE DERVOL, 

University of Arizona, 

Tucson, Arizona. 

It is a chasm to afford a place wherein 
the soul may seek repose, and which may 
prompt the deepest emotions to great 
activity, and lift man above himself. 



September j, 1896. 

Rev. ULYSSES Q. B. PIERCE, 
Pomona, Cal. 



September j, 1896. 

Mrs. WM. F. LEWIS, 

Fart Apache, A. T. 



September 14., 1896. 

HELEN A. RIORDAN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 



9 8 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



September 22, 1896. 

V. H. EDMUNDSON, M. D. 

Gallup, N. M, 



September 22, 1896, 

HARRIETTE F. CODWISE, 

Kingston, N. Y. 



September 22, 1896. 
Maj. and Mrs. W. M. WALLACE. 



September 30, 1896. 

I. W. RAND, 

First Lieut. Asst. Surgeon, U. S. A. 
Fort Apache, A. T. 



October 23, 1896. 

WM. AUGUST BARROIS, 

Lile, France. 



October 23, 1896. 
L. BERKER. 



October 30, 1896. 

KATHARINE ARMS, 
Mrs. CHAS. D. ARMS, 
CAROLYN WICK ARMS, 

Youngstown, Ohio. 



November jj, 1896. 

GEO. E. WHITE, 
MINNIE A. WHITE, 

Prescott, Arizona, 



November 15, 1896. 

N. O. flURPHY, 
NELLIE MURPHY, 

Prescott, Arizona. 

"s^x-xx-v^ 

November 28, 1896. 
HERflAN KOBBE, 

Good luck to Captain Hance on his 
prospecting tour, and may he strike a 
bonanza. 

November 28, 1896. 

MAGNUS C. MYER, 

Chicago, 111. 

Many a land has seen my eyes, many 
a mountain crossed my foot, but never 
seen such wonderful creations as this, 
the Grand Canon of the Colorado. 



Close of the visiting record for the 
year 1896. 



Monday, April 19, 1897. 

The Opening of the Season. 

JAMES G. DUNCAN, 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y 
Miss A. ENDICOTT, 

nartin, N. Y 




CHIMNEY ROCK, GRAND CANON. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



101 



J. ALEXANDER MOONE, M. D., 
Helena, Montana. 

We all visited Moran and Bissell's 
Point. A grand sight. 



April 24, 1897. 

RUDOLF FBACH, 

Barmen, Germany. 

April 26, 1897. 

P. C. BICKNELL, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

May i, 1897. 

fir. and Mrs. W. H. WOOLWORTH. 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Visited Moran's Point, Bissell's Point, 
and walked part way down John Hance's 
trail. Language seems weak and inade- 
quate to the task of describing the gran- 
deur of the Grand Canon of the Colorado 
River. 



May 5, 

Rev. ULYSSES Q. B. PIERCE, 

First Unitarian Church. 
FLORENCE LONSBURY PIERCE, 
Pomona, Cal. 

Log Hotel dedicated August 6, 1896. 



May 5, 1897. 
JAMES PRINGLE, 

Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Since leaving my native land of Scot- 



land I have traveled upwards of thirty 
thousand miles, over three fourths of 
this globe, but have nowhere seen so 
awe-inspiring a sight as the Grand Canon 
of the Colorado River, said to be une- 
qualed in the world. I believe no artist 
has yet been born who can adequately 
portray it, nor any word-painter can do 
justice to so majestic a theme. It is, to 
my mind, a humbling sight, and the main 
lesson it teaches us is the littleness of 
man. What is man, that thou art mind- 
ful of him ? 



May j, 1897. 

Miss JONES, 
E. A. JONES, 

Both of Brooklyn, N. Y. 



May 13, 1897. 

F. W. MORRIS, Jr., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



May 1 
GEO. S. GERHARD, M. D. 

Philadelphia, Pa 



May 14, 1897. 

R. S. HAYES, 
ANN N. HAYES, 

Both of New York, 

The biggest thing on earth. 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



May 14, 1897. 

CORLEIA R. BEAN, 
BLANCH BEAN. 

Long live the canon. May its grandeur 
never grow less. 



ALDACE F. WALKER. 

A. T. & S. F. R. R. 

Endorsement guaranteed. 



May 14, 1897. 

HENRY J. CAMGAN, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



May 16, 1897. 

Mr. and Mrs. THOS. GOFFERY, 
Liverpool. 

Went down the canon, under the guid- 
ance of Captain John Hance, and would 
advise every one else to do likewise, as 
no proper conception of the canon can be 
gained from above. 



May 19, 1897. 
W. E. NELSON, 



May 20, 1897. 
ARTHUR D1XON, 



Quincy, 111. 



Illinois. 



May 21 

firs. E. L. REYNOLDS, 

South Bend, Ind. 

What are the pyramids of Egypt, works 
of man, compared to the works of the 
Almighty. 



May 22) 

AGNES FARRAND, 

South Bend, Ind. 



May 22, 1897. 

CATHARINE C. E. SMAY, 

South Bend, Ind. 



May 22, 1897. 

EDWARD EVERTT SER, 

riontgomery City, Mo. 

In testimony of Captain Hance's idea 
of truth. 



May 22, 1897. 

Dr. MONS CARL MULLER, 

Prag, Austria. 



RUDOLF de HALEN, 

Hanover, Germany. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



103 



May 24, 1897. 

JAflES H. HcCLINTOCK, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

In his way, Hance is as great as the 
canon. 



May 25, 1897. 

JOHN A. BECKWITH, 

Oakland, Cal. 

If Dickens had only been John Hance, 
what a book he could have written. As 
for the canon, it is undoubtedly the most 
wonderful thing of its kind on this earth. 
The crater of Kilauea, in violent action, 
is possibly the more impressive of the 
two. 



May 27, 1897. 
PREBIN A. LAURING. 



May 28, 1897. 



QEO. W. REEVE, 
ARCHIE REEVE, 



flontreal. 



May 28, 1897. 

JOHN ADAMS LOWELL, 

Boston, Mass. 



May 28, 1897. 

L. MACDONALD, 

Montreal, Canada, 

^*-^X-N^N*<-V-'-N B x-XX^/ 

May 31, 1897 . 

KANSAS TOURISTS. 

We hope when next 

We visit the canons, 
To find John and 
. Peck dearer companions. 

May she put on a dress, 

To cover her pants, 
And change her name 

To Mrs. John Hance. 

May they be supplied 
With plenty of bedding, 

When we all come to dance, 
At the Hance-Peck wedding. 

John, if ever inclined 

To go on a tipple, 
Just go to the canon, 

And behold Peck's nipple. 



May 31, 1897. 

J. P. CAMPBELL, 

Ashland, Kans. 

Next to the Grand Canon, Captain John 
Hance and his trail are two of the great- 
est wonders of the world. The half was 
never told. 



June i, 1897. 

ROBERT W. PARK, 

Stockyards, 

Kansas City, flo, 



104 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



June i, 1897. 

F. MOULTON BARRETT, 

Devon, England. 

During our stay at the Grand Canon, 
we were much indebted to Captain Hance 
for his excellent arrangements, courtesy, 
and his wonderful information. 



June 7, 

GILBERT DAVIDSON, 

Devon, England. 

I heartily endorse all my friend has 
said. 



June 7, 1897. 

fl. C. CAMPBELL, 

Wichita, Kans. 

El Canon Grande" de la Colorado is, in 
my judgment, one of the greatest wonders 
of the world. Captain Hance, the mod- 
ern path-finder, well deserving the title. 



June 7, 

H. RIEDflAN, 

Hamburg, Germany. 

Heartily endorsing everything said 
above. 



June 7, 1897. 

JOS. TANGERNAN, 

Newport- Ky. 



June 7, 

G. W. MEAD, Jr., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



June 6, 1897. 

fir. and Mrs. ERNEST de SASSE= 
VILLE, 

Denver, Colo. 



June 10, 1897. 

FRANK J. HAHN, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

The kindness of Captain Hance and 
Mr. Clayton have made our stay a very 
pleasant one. 



June 70, 

EMILIE F. HAHN. 

In testimony of the courtesy and kind 
ness of Captain John Hance and Mr. 
Clayton. 



June 77, 

R. W. DANA. 

Delighted with everything, even the 
mules. 



June 7j, 1897. 

CHAS. STANFORD. 

Vastly pleased with the whole trip. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



105 



June /j, 1897. 
P. E. KIPP. 

Marvelous are Thy works, and that my 
soul knoweth right well. 



June i, 1897. 

WALTER Q. BENTLEY, 

200 Randolph St., 
Chicago, 111. 

While memory holds a seat in this dis- 
tracted orb shall I forget the impression 
made by this short acquaintance with the 
greatest of all natural wonders. It is a 
great pleasure to be able to vouch for 
Captain John Hance, as guide and friend, 
without whom tourists would be deprived 
of the most impressive part of their visit, 
a trip down the trail to the river. After 
a trip down the trail and back yesterday, 
and a visit to Points Moran and Bissell 
to-day, under the Hance guidance, would 
certainly urge every visitor to avail him- 
self of Mr. Hance's trail, thereby assuring 
to himself the very best condition for get- 
ting the most value out of his visit. 



June 23, 1897. 

IRA D. HAVEN, WIFE and DAUQH= 
TER, 

Oakland, Cal. 



June 26, 1897. 

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN R. VOSKAMP, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



June 14 to July i, 

AMELIA B. HOLLENBACK, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Thank Captain Hance and the canon 
for the happiest two weeks any one ever 
spent. 

-^v^-x^-vy 

June 14 to July i, 1897. 

JOSEPHINE W. HOLLENBACK, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Our expectations for years have beeh 
fully and more than happily realized dur- 
ing the last two weeks. To Captain John 
Hance we are deeply indebted for his 
untiring courtesy and kindness, which 
have helped to make our visit at the 
Grand Canon all that it has been to us. 



July 2, 

THOS. R. LATTA, 
WM. JACK LATTA, 
HAMIE LESH LATTA, 

Qoshen, Ind. 

July 2, 1897. 

Mrs. MARY E. LESH, 

Goshen, Ind. 

v^N^-X/N^N^-S^ 

July 2, 1897. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. TAYLOR, 
Arrowsmith, 111. 

Words are inadequate to express the 
awful sublimity and grandeur of the 
Grand Canon. Many thanks to Captain 
John Hance for his kindness. 



io6 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



Ju'y 2, 1897. 

H. C. McCLURE AND WIFE, 

Qileson City, 111. 

Whilst li r e lasts we can never forget 
the generous kindness and humane hos- 
pitality of our friend, Captain John Hance. 
May he have long life in his well-doing. 



July 2, 1897. 
T. C. POLING, 



Quincy, 111. 



Any one who comes to the Grand 
Canon, and fails to meet Captain John 
Hance, will miss half the show. I can 
certify that he can tell the truth, though 
it is claimed by his friends that he is not 
exactly like the Rev. Geo. W. in that 
particular, as he can do the other thing 
when necessary to make a story sound 
right. Long live Captain Hance. 



July 7, 1897. 

W. A. HALL, 

Whitewater, Wis. 

For the Lord is a Great God. In His 
hand are the deep places of the earth. 
Psalms, xcv:3, 4. 



July 7, 1897. 

fir. and firs. F. A. PATTEE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Had an out-of-sight time. Words fail 
to express our delight and satisfaction 
with all we have seen. 



July 7, 1897. 

F. A. PATTEE. 

My Dear Captain: 

You may build trails into it, up it, and 
around it; you may ever take a few more 
of those celebrated horseback-jumps over 
its crest, but you can never catch up with 
it. Yours, in the world where they lie 
still some day. 



July io, 1897. 

LEE DOYLE, 
CHESTER BLACK, 
JOHNIE DOYLE, 
GEORGE BLACK, 
JinMIE SMITH, 
BURT DOYLE, 

All of Flagstaff, Ariz. 



July /5, 1897. 

S. G. BAYNE, 

New York. 



July 16, 1897. 

Dr. B. WALLA, 

Budapest, Hungary. 



July 16, 1897. 

KALflOIN SAXLETHER, 

Budapest, Hungary. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



109 



July 24, 

WM. J. McCLURE, 

Stapleton, N. Y. 

Traversed the rim of the Grand Canon 
of the Colorado River July 24, 1897, and 
descended to the Colorado River, in 
company with C. E. Shaver and Captain 
John Hance, the guide, July 25th. We 
had, therefore, the double pleasure of a 
downward and upward view of the glo- 
rious Grand Canon. 



July 24, 1897. 

C. E. SHAVER, 

Phoenix, A. T. 

To the river and back from the hotel 
in eight hours, in company with Father 
McClure and Captain John Hance. 



July 2 
Mrs. LEAH D. SCANDRETT. 

Spent the 30th on the rim near hotel. 
August ist, went to Moran's Point. 
Viewed from any place on the rim, and 
especially Moran's Point, the canon is the 
most sublime and awe-inspiring sight one 
may ever hope to see on this earth. 



July 2 9t 

H. V. SCANDRETT, 

Spearville, Kan. 

There are few subjects too large for a 
Kansasan to tackle, but to express my- 
self on this wonderful masterpiece is to 
me the exception that proves the rule. 
Am afraid I shall not be able to tell my 
friends anything about it, without endan- 
gering my standing for truthfulness. 



August 7, 1897. 
DAVID W. FAHS. 

Great and marvelous are Thy works, 
O Lord. In wisdom hast Thou made 
them all. 



August 10, 1897. 
THOS. Q. FROST AND WIFE, 
Minneapolis. 



AugUSt 77, 

G. W. PURSELL, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

To-day, in company with Captain John 
Hance, I discovered and explored the first 
great prominences beyond Fort Hollen- 
beck, and named the same " Point Die- 
waido." 



August H, 1897. 
RUBY E. COBB, 



Denver, Colo. 



JAS. S. NIES, 



Brooklyn, N. Y 



Full many a song and dance I 've heard, 

Upon the vaudeville stage, 
But none can beat the yarns you Ml get 

From Capt. John Hance, I wage. 

The woman fat, between the rocks, 

By giant-powder saved 
The mare who jumped two thousand feet, 

And other dangers braved. 



no 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



But to appreciate him best, 
Just hear him for yourself, 

And let him guide you o'er the trail. 
And don't you spare yourself. 



August 18, 1897. 

Mrs. ROBERT MURRAY, 

London, Ontario. 



August 19, 1897. 

MAGGIE J. MURRAY, 

London, Ontario. 



August 

Dr. W. FREUVENTHAL, 

New York City, N. Y. 

August 19, 1897. 
Mrs. D. J. BRANNEN, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

The sublimity of the scene forbids all 
other thoughts except those of reverence 
and awe. 



Aiigust 27 , 1897. 
C. J. BABBITT, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

^-^ 

August 27, 1897 . 

PAUL H. VERKAMP, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



August 27, 1897. 

Mrs. ROBERT C. MORRIS, 
ROBERT C. MORRIS, 

Both of New York City, N. Y 



August 27, 1897. 

D. L. E. BRAINARD, 

Captain C. S., U. S. A, 



August 29, 1897. 
Dr. T. F. ALLEN, 

New York City, N. Y, 



August 29, 1897. 

Hiss EVELYN H. NORDHOFF, 
New York City, N.Y, 



August 29, 1897. 
Mrs. CHAS. NORDHOFF, 

Coronado Beach, Cal. 



August 29, 1897. 

AARON GOLDBURG, 
Miss A. GOLDBURG, 

Both of Phoenix, A. T. 



September 14, 1897. 

Mme. ROUNSEVILLE, 

Chicago, HI. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



Ill 



September 14, 1897. 
nARGUERITE SHONTS. 

Pleased with everything, even Captain 
John Hance. 



September 16, 1897. 
A. REICLINQ, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

September 25, 1897. 

E. W. BOYD, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

Persons visiting the Grand Canon, 
without taking the trail to the river, have 
failed to see the beauty of the place. 
The trail is perfectly safe. I rode from 
top to bottom. Enjoyed it hugely. As 
to John Hance, he is very gentlemanly, 
but a curiosity of the rarest type. 



September 26, 1897 . 
J. F. JACKSON, 

nilwaukee, Wis. 

The canon is all right. 



September 29, 1897. 

J. D. CROISSANT, 

Washington, D. C. 

I cheerfully record my name in this 
book as among those who fully appre- 
ciate the grandeur of this great canon. 
I have stood upon the brink, and looked 
down into the mouth of seething Vesu- 
vius; have looked down upon Switzer- 



land's charming lakes from Regi; have 
climbed to the top of Mt. Washington and 
Pike's Peak, and have just come from a 
week's stay in charming Yosemite, and I 
freely record my opinion that there is 
nothing on earth that will ever compete 
with this Grand Canon. Captain John 
Hance, our faithful guide, is quite as 
unique in his way as the canon itself. 



September 29, 1897. 

DEWITT CLINTON CROISSANT, 
Washington, D. C. 

Everything surpasses what it has been 
cracked up to be; only be sure when 
ordering a lunch to have them put in an 
extra sandwich. Captain Hance, with all 
his lies, is a most trustworthy individual. 



September 29, 1897. 
DAVID FORBES, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Glorious, laborious. Glad I went. 
Thankful it's over. Special thanks to 
Captain Hance. Splendid guide, in spite 
of his economy of the truth. 



September 29, 1897 , 
GUY L. FRAZER, 

Highlands, Cal. 



September 29, 1897. 

J. A. HOLMES, 

U. S. Geological Survey. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



112 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



October 6, 1897. 

H. CARPENTER, 

Chicago, III. 



October 12, 1897. 
ANNIE J. QARLIDE. 

Oh my! Oh my! Oh my! The half 
was never told. Good luck to Captain 
Hance and all the good people at the 
Grand Canon Hotel. 



October 16, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. MOSS. 

John Hance is half and the Grand 
Canon is the other half. 



ANNA M. FLEMING, 
F. S. HAFFORD, 
nARY L. WHITE, 
flARY flcGILL, 
STANLY WINDES, 
C. RUTH OPDYKE, 

Prescott, A. T. 

She strode along with a manly stroke, 
Till the puckering string of her bloom- 
ers broke. 



October 23, 1897. 

MABEL A. GARLAND, 

Pomona, Cal. 



October 24, 1897. 

A. JUDSON BALL, 
MARY H. BALL, 

Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

The half never has been nor never 
can be told. 



THE CANON. 

Born in an earthquake's shock, 
And carved by the roaring flood, 

Ye mighty piles of rock, 
Great handiwork of God. 



November 4, 1897. 

F. H. LIVERMORE, 
Mrs. F. M. LIVERMORE, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

-^V-^N^X. 

November 4, 1897. 
D. M. FRANCIS, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

s^s-*^s-\ 

November 4, 1897. 
Miss S. L. PHILLIPS, 

Denver, Colo. 



Close of season 1897. 



April ^5, 1898. 
J. J. LONERGAN, 

Los Angeles, Cal, 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



April 25, 1898. 

JOHN MARSHALL, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

April 25, 1898. 

J. M. SIMPSON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Crossed the river below rapids, at foot 
of Hance's trail, April 27th. Very rough, 
and high water; 26th, down trail; 27th, 
across river; 28th, up; 29th, Cameron & 
Berry mine; soth, at hotel; May ist, re- 
turned home. 



April 26, 1808. 
DENNY BRERETON. 

I went to the river with Captain John 
Hance last Saturday, and I think it 
enables one to much better appreciate 
the magnitude and wonders of this great 
canon. 



May 2, 1898. 

C. H. VEEDER, 

Hartford, Conn. 

Snow twelve inches deep. 



May 3, 1898. 
EDWIN O. STANARD, Jr. 

Went around the rim in a snow-storm. 
May 4th, started down to the river. Snow 
and rain all day. Roughest passage Cap- 



tain Hance ever made (so he says). 
Weather cleared several times during 
the day. Trip greatly enjoyed. Would 
do it again in similar weather, if neces- 
sary. Better in a snow-storm than not at 
all. Time to river, two hours and thirty 
minutes; back, three hours and thirty 
minutes. 



May 5, 1898. 
H. Q. REIST, 

Schenectady, New York. 



, '898. 
CAROLINE CARPENTER, 

Mass. 

To take a ride with Capt. Hance, 

On his dead-level trail, 
Is sure to fill one's soul with joy, 

Whatever else may fail. 



May 10, 1808. 

E. S. HEERS, 

White Hall, Mich. 

Self and daughter descended to the 
river this day on foot, except that my 
daughter rode up. Captain Hance was 
very kind and attentive. 



May 10, 1808. 

L. A. HEINER, 

Redwood City, Cal. 

The Grand Canon, Nature's crowning 
work. 



1 1 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



May 19, 
W. R. WEAVER, 



Bradford, Pa. 



May 19, 1898. 
Mrs. L. E. riAHSHEAR, 
Mr. L. E. HAMSHEAR, 

Bradford, Pa. 



May 19, 1 

C. P. COLLINS, 
BURT COLLINS, 



Bradford, Pa, 



May 19, 1898. 

WALDA HARDISON, 

Bradford, Pa. 



May 19, 1898. 
J. R. LEONARD, 



Beaver, Pa. 



May 19, 1898. 

QEO. W. CRAWFORD, 

Emlinton, Pa. 



May 19, 1898. 

HARRY HEASLEY, 

Emlinton, Pa. 



May jo, 1898. 

Hrs. GEO. P. BOWLER. 



May 30, 1898. 
Miss A. HUNT. 



May jo, 1898. 

DAVID WILLCOSC. 



May 30, 1898. 

VICTOR HORAHETZ. 



June 2, it 
JAS. M. HIXON, 



Lacrosse, Wis. 



June 4, 1898. 

MAURICE LONQENECKER, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



June 4, 1898. 

E. R. WEBSTER, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



June 5, 1898. 

E. BURTON HOLMES, 

Chicago, 111. 




WATERFALL, GRAND CANON. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



117 



June 5, 1898. 

OSCAR B. DEPUE, 

Chicago, 111. 

June 7, 1898. 

flARY V. WORSTELL, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Drummond, to the contrary, the great- 
est thing in the world is the Grand Canon 
of the Colorado. 

June 12, 1898. 

JAMES N. SUYDAH, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

June 22) 1898. 

Mrs. JAMES GAYLER, 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

June 24., 1898." 
C. P. WILSON, 
Pastor M. E. Church, Flagstaff. 

June 24., 1898. 

Mrs. W. S. ROBINSON, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

June 24., 1898. 

ANNETTE P. WARD, 

Columbus, Ohio. 

Julys, 1898. 

C. D. STEWART. 

Four of us left hotel at 5:30 A.M., and 



went to the river and back on foot. We 
were five hours descending. Coming 
back, two of us got up before dark; one 
was brought up on a horse at 9 130, and 
one stayed all night in the canon. The 
moral of this is that one must be a moun- 
taineer in experience and in perfect form 
for tramping, if he will walk down to the 
river and back the same day. The heat 
is intense and overpowering on the lower 
levels, because the rocks are bare of 
foliage, and when they become heated 
by the sun the trail is like a baker's oven. 
By all means go to the river. The ex- 
perience alone is worth the trip; but take 
a horse, or mule even, if you do not take 
a guide. The trail is as good a mountain 
trail as is often found, and the Captain's 
stock are well-selected animals, and are 
good ones, as one of the four mentioned 
above. 



Julys, 1898. 

SHURLEY C. WALKER, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

I enjoyed the experience immensely, 
more on account of its success as a 
pedestrian trip than because I reached 
the river. Result, fifteen hours' work, 
one gallon water, gain in muscle, loss in 
flesh, plenty of experience. Hoping to 
be indorsed by all the other three com- 
panions, I remain, Yours. 



July 6, 1898. 

EDWARD N. BUTT. 

I have had much experience in moun- 
tain-climbing, and German professors also 
do much good work in that way, but I 
shall never forget the forlorn appearance 



n8 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



of Herr Dr. , Professor of Geography, 

who, when our party were descending to 
the river to-day, we discovered lying on 
the ground, in the shade of a tree, at 9 
A.M., about an hour down from the rim. 
He had then been two hours in the great 
gulf of the Grand Canon; was utterly ex- 
hausted, and had been without food or 
water for many long, weary hours. Moral. 
Do not attempt to descend or ascend the 
Grand Canon on foot, but take one of 
Captain Hance' s mules. 



July 5, /, 

ROBERT L. STEPHENSON, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Our pleasures here have been enhanced 
by chivalrous, daring, entertaining, and 
ever-obliging Captain Hance. Hence, 
it gives us pleasure second only to that of 
viewing the canon, to attest to his faithful, 
careful, and vigilant guidance at all times 
and to all places. 



MARY ASCHERER, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



ELIZABETH F. BARTLETT, 

San Francisco, Cal, 



J. SELBY HANNA, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



QEO. M. SMITH, 

Anheuser Wells, Ariz. 



EDWARD BUTT, 

London, England. 

S**~S~***S\^r*>^r^r>< t ^^ i ^^ l ^^ 

SARAH C. SCOF1ELD, 

San Antonia, Texas. 

^r^^-^-^***^^-***^^***"*^^^*^^ 

EMEUAL D. CALLAQHAN, 
W. F. CALLAQHAN, 

England. 

XN^\X\XXXN^X^>^* 

July 15, 1898. 
C. P. HICKS. 



July 75, 1898. 
J. L. SIMMONS, 



Prescott, A. T. 



July 30, 1898. 

EVA ESTELLA MARTIN. 

Our party took in what is called the 
"rim view" yesterday. No words can 
in any way describe it. There are hun- 
dreds and hundreds of canons and great 
ducal palaces put into one great, vast 
canon. After all is said the trip is made 
very much pleasanter by the companion- 
ship of Captain Hance. Some one really 
ought to write a book all about the 
Captain. 



July jo, 1898. 

EMMA and GEO. F. HARRING- 
TON, 

Crown King, Ariz. 

Had the author of the creation viewed 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



119 



this majestic scene what wonderful sym- 
phonies would have been composed by 
this Master of Choral Composition. The 
marvelous work, behold, amazed, comes 
to one's mind constantly while viewing 
the Grand Canon. I shall not attempt to 
describe the sight, but shall urge my 
friends to go and see for themselves, and 
the guidance and companionship of Cap- 
tain Hance is invaluable. No visitor of 
the Grand Canon can afford to make the 
mistake of failing to appreciate his rugged 
humor and great kindness of heart. 



July jo, 1898. 

BELL MARTIN, 
Webster, 
Westmoreland Co., Pa. 

We stood and gazed on the Grand 
Canon with feelings of reverence and 
awe, and involuntarily exclaimed, "How 
marvelous are Thy works, Oh Lord ! 
In wisdom hast Thou made them all." 
Our trip around the rim, under the careful 
guidance of Captain John Hance, was most 
delightful, but words fail when one attempts 
to describe it. 



July jo, 1898. 

FLORA DUNCAN, 

Mt. Pleasant, Penn. 

Alex and Kitty are the ones. Get Alex 
for the trip around the rim, Kitty for the 
trip down in the canon. The Captain is 
an excellent guide. The going down in 
the canon is easy. I don't think the same 
about coming out. 



July 30, 1898. 

EDNA FAY MARTIN, 

Prescott, A. T. 

The Captain calls me the "Prescott 
Kid." 



July jo, 1898. 
GEO. M. SMITH, 



Kas. City, Mo. 

After seventy days' search, I fail to find 
words with which to express my thoughts 
of the Grand Canon, of its immensity, 
its grandeur, and beauty. I cannot believe 
that man can describe it. Many thanks to 
the famous Captain John Grand Canon 
Hance, for his many kindnesses during 
my stay. 



July jo, 

E. T. HUTCHINS, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Our Captain deserves great credit in 
being able to build such a wonderful trail. 



August 10, it 
M. P. FREEHAN, 



Tucson, Ariz. 



Captain John Hance, old man, you are 
a "brick" in every sense of the word. 
Your company has added much to the 
pleasure of my stay. I shall not forget 
you. 



120 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



fl. C. HAST AND WIFE. 

We made the trip down the canon in 
fine shape, due to our good guide and 
companion, Captain John Hance. Long 
may he live. 



August 12, 1898. 

E. BURTON HOLnES, 

Chicago, 111. 



August 12, 1898. 
ARTHUR STUDD, 

London, England, 
Chicago, 111. 



August 12, 1898. 
R. N. RIPLEY, 



August 12, 1898. 
ORCAR B. DEPUE, 



Chicago, 111. 



Chicago, 111 



August 12, 1898. 

Mrs. J. M. HENDERSON, 
Miss J. F. HENDERSON, 
CHAS. A. HENDERSON, 
H. H. HENDERSON, 
F. B. HENDERSON, 

Los Angeles, Cal, 



August 12, 1898. 
EHMA KERR, 



Watsonville, Cal, 



August 16, 1898. 

RICHARD E. SLOAN, 
Mrs. R. SLOAN, 
Mrs. R. S. STOCKTON, 
RICHARD S. STOCKTON, 
ELEANOR SLOAN, 
RICHARD SLOAN, Jr., 

All of Prescott, Ariz. 



August 1 6, 1898. 

Miss BELLA CASSIN, 

Watsonville, Cal. 



August 16, 1898. 

C. H. CALKVEN, 

Amsterdam, Holland. 



August 23, 1898. 

FRANCES O. FISHER, 

Prescott, Ariz. 



August 23, 1898. 

Miss BLANCH FERRINQTON, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



121 



August 23, 1898. 
Mrs. J. W. FRANCIS, 
LeNORE FRANCIS, 
FRANK BEAL, 
ALLEN DAVISON, 

All of Flagstaff, A. T. 

THEO. L. SCHULTZ, 
firs. THEO. L. SCHULTZ, 

Tempe, A. T. 

^^^r^^-^r^r^^r^^^ 

August 23, 1898. 

Miss FANNIE HICKETHIER, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

r 

August 24, 1898. 

Mrs. JOHN Y. T. SMITH, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



AugUSt 24, !(. 

Mrs. T. L. SHULTZ, 

Tempe, Ariz. 

August 25, 1898. 

Miss AGNES B. TODD, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

August 26, 1898. 

CHESTER P. DORLAND, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Captain John Hance, a genius, a phi- 
losopher, and a poet, the possessor of a 



fund of information vastly important, if 
true. He laughs with the giddy, yarns to 
the gullible, talks sense to the sedate, and 
is a most excellent judge of scenery, human 
nature, and pie. To see the canon only, 
and not to see Captain John Hance, is to 
miss half the show. 



August 27, 1898. 

P. MINOR AND WIFE, 

Phoenix, A. T. 



August 27, 1898. 

E. T. STIMSON AND WIFE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Septembers, 1898. 
KATE L. BASSETT, 

Phoenix, A. T, 



September^, 1898. 

Mrs. R. B. BURNS, 

Williams, A. T. 



September 5, 1898. 
SAfl R. BETTS, 



New York City, 



September 5, 
Q. W. PHELCO, 



Tucson, A. T. 



122 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



September 5, 1 
FRED WETZLER. 

*^^^^^~^^^^^^^s-*^r^>~^s^s-^ ll > 

September 5, 1898. 

JENNIE EDETH GRAY, 

Lyndon, Vermont. 

Five days long to be remembered. 



September 7, it 
J. K. HARE, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Captain Hance's birthday, forty-eight 
years old. May his years to come be as 
many as the tales he tells; but this, we 
are afraid, would prolong his life far into 
the millennium. 



September 7, 1898. 

J. F. FLAGG, 
Miss FLAGQ. 

^^v-^N-^X-^N.^XXX^\x-\^N/X 

September, 7, 1898. 
R. B. WILLIAMSON, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



September 12, n 

ARTHUR R. REYNOLDS, 

Chicago, 111. 

I believe all the Captain's stories to be 
true, and if any one in the future should 
doubt, send him to me that I may do bat- 
tle with him. To Captain John Hance, 
Grand Canon of the Colorado. 



September 13, 1898. 
JAMES SMITH, 

Flagstaff, Arizona. 

It is unfortunate that the words grand, 
sublime, and awful have been so over- 
worked. These words, which otherwise 
might have been useful in expressing 
one's thoughts of the Grand Canon, John 
Hance, etc., have so lost their meaning 
that English fails to express my thoughts. 
All that I can do is to say that this, the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River, is 
the grandest sight on earth. 



September 75, 1898. 
C. F. GUNTHER, 



Chicago, 111. 



September 19, 1898. 
EDMUND J. BART. 

It 's a ditch of all the ditches. That 's all. 



September 79, 1898. 
EDMOND CARLETON, 

New York City, N. Y. 

With sincere admiration for Captain 
John Hance, the faithful custodian of the 
greatest natural curiosity and most sublime 
formation in the world. 



September 79, 1898. 

firs. NORflAN W. CUTTER, 

San Jose, Cal. 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 



125 



September 20, 1898. 
WM. BRIDHAM. 

See the Grand Canon, and know Cap- 
tain Hance, you will never forget them, 
sure thing. 



September 21 ", 1898. 

Mr. and Mr. C. n. BERGSTRES- 
SER, 

New York City, N. Y. 

This is Mr. John Hance' s book, and no 
record of a trip through the canon without 
reference to Mr. Hance, his company as a 
guide, is good, to say the least. His 
knowledge of the canon is extensive, and 
his trail has passed into history as one of 
the most famous in the canon. His genial 
nature, and his anecdotes and Indian tales, 
add much to the pleasure of doing the 
canon. 



September 21, 1898. 

CHAS. H. TOWNSEND. 

U. S. Fish Commissioner. 

To Captain John Hance, of the Grand 
Canon: Good-by; and may it be many a 
year before you take the trail to the camp 
from which no one comes back. 



September 23, 1898. 

JNO. J. VALENTINE. 

My Dear Captain Hance: Hoping that 
the dear Lord may be good to you, and 
not call for you too soon. 



September 23, 1898. 
Miss M. J. VALENTINE. 

Many good wishes for a long and pros- 
perous life is my wish for you, Captain. 



September 23, 
MARY E. PRIDHAfl. 

Captain Hance, I hope to hear of your 
finding that fish-hook. 



September 23, 

ETHEL VALENTINE. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Many appreciations to Captain John 
Hance for adding greatly to the pleasure 
of my trip to the Grand Canon. A comedy 
without the comedian is not fully enjoyed; 
the canon, without Captain Hance, is not 
complete. 



September 23, 1898. 
WM. H. ZINN. 

The thing I most admire about Captain 
John Hance is his conscientious truthful- 
ness. I have perfect faith in all of the 
stories he has told me. 



September 26, 1898. 
EDWIN A. BECK. 

Shall hope some day to return and ride 
Cape Horn with you, and take one more 
ride to the river. 



126 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE GRAND CANON. 



September 26, 1898. 
EARL C. ANTHONY. 

Hope to return again and take some 
more photographs, with Captain Hance's 
able assistance. 

^-'-X^X^'-X^X-X-X^-N^X^N^-S^ 

September 26, 1898. 
CHAS. E. ANTHONY. 

My trip with you has been glorious, and 
my only regret is that I did not take the 
trip to the river with you. Hope to come 
again some time, Captain, simply for that 
ride. 



October 6, 1898. 

LOTTIE SHERWOOD, 
nAUD SHERWOOD, 

Winslow, A. T. 



FRANK C. REID. 

The Grand Canon is an expression of 
God's mightiest thought, and is not trans- 
ferable into terms of human speech, one 
of the things " not possible to be uttered." 



October i, 

R. and E. E. F. SKEEL. 

Farewell to the gorge, 
And to Captain John Hance, 
Whose mendacious inventions outdo all 

romance. 
With his fibs he can charm, with his yarns 

he enchants; 
And as if these great gifts to still further 

enhance, 
With a bolster he is going to learn how to 

dance. 
Oh may we return, by some rare, happy 

chance, 
To this spot, and be welcomed by Captain 

John Hance. 



ANNETTE P. WARD. 

Since seeing that great wonder, the 
Grand Canon, I never hear a bit of beau- 
tiful, soul-stirring music but that the canon 
rises before my inner vision. Listening to 
the exquisite strains of harmony, I gaze 
into that indescribable beauty of coloring 
which enwraps those awful, weird, mys- 
terious depths, and like a soft accom- 
paniment to the music, I hear the sighing 
of the pines; and the harmony of the 
music and the harmony of the enchanting 
beauties of the scene are blended into one 
perfect whole, a veritable feast for the 
memory. 




HEAD OF COTTONWOOD CANON ON GRAND VIEW TRAIL. 



THE GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO, 

What wrought this wonder? 
Unique, stupendous, weird and grand! 
How came it here at whose command? 
Not Jove with all his bolts of thunder 
Could blast and tear these rocks asunder, 
And leave them where they stand. 

What monster dart, 
Or blade, did angry demons wield 
To smite earth's breast, is not revealed; 
Nor why they tore the wound apart; 
As if to find her bleeding heart- 
So that it never healed. 

The thought dismiss. 
The fiercest blast the rudest shock 
From Pluto's fiery realm, but mock 
The mighty power which fashioned this 
Yawning gulf, this vast abyss: 
These battlements of rock! 

Perchance we may 
Let sage and hoary Neptune tell 
How, by their own erodic spell, 
The ocean currents wore away 
These rocks, in some far distant day, 
And carved these forms so well. 

We stand aghast 

Upon this brink! nor hear the flow, 
By which this desert stream, we know, 
Still fights its way as in the past 
Six thousand feet below. 

129 



130 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE GRAND CANON. 

Here silence reigns, 

And here, where science too is mute, 

We leave to fools the vain dispute. 

We call! no voice an answer deigns: 

These awful depths but mock our pains: 

Profundus absolute ! 

C. R. PATTEE. 



THE STALACTITE CAVES OF THE GRAND CANON. 

J. CURTIS WASSON. 

Perhaps the destined single attraction of the Grand Canon is the 
new Stalactite Caves, lately discovered about 3,000 feet below the 
rim. The formations within the caves are something wonderful. 
Passing in through an aperture some eight feet in diameter, a large 
avenue of limestone leads you on until you are suddenly surprised 
to find yourself standing in a large rotunda with a great high 
ceiling, suspended from which are long stalactite formations, some 
so long in fact that they almost reach the stalagmite formations 
protruding from the floor beneath. 

Winding in and out, up and down, through long cavernous 
recesses, now through a tunnel leading to greater and longer 
tunnels, which in turn act as a vestry, making an entrance to other 
large domes, which, having avenues after avenues leading out to 
other domes, halls, recesses, avenues, etc., until the feet becoming 
weary we, candles in hand, sit down upon some snowy formation 
beneath, and while the candles flicker, as if offering a faint murmur 
against the impenetrable darkness, which feign would obscure our 
vision with its itensity, the awful stillness seems to bear down upon 
all mental activity and bid it relegate all thought to the rear. 

But as if in defiance of that awful foreboding which seems to 
come when the fall of a footstep, the breaking away of a formation, 
or the sound of a voice finds the sequel in the echo and re-echoing 
of each cavern, dome, avenue, and pit in that great subterranean 
cavern where King Phantom may reign supreme with a retinue of 
fairies, imps, and hobgoblins to go at his bidding, in defiance of 
this our mind unconsciously lingers on the uniqueness of the 
situation. 

Our lights having been extinguished, we await the awful still- 
ness which a place thus isolated alone can give, so intense in fact 



134 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE GRAND CANON. 

that the darkness of a Plutonian Shore becomes a veritable light- 
house. 

Our heart-beats becoming audible, and the darkness becoming 
depressing with its intensity, it is with great relief that we again 
relight our candles, doubling the number. 

Looking directly in front some twenty feet, we see towering 
upward a great massive artificial edifice made by the constant 
dripping of ages. Bearing as it did such a strong resemblance to 
another great historic edifice we (as our eyes were first to see this 
the Second Cave discovered) called it the " Hanging Garden of 
Babylon." 

The fantastic forms, the enormous dimensions, the variegated 
coloring, from a pure white to a rich creamy hue, the graduated 
blending of one form, texture, color into another quite different, 
but none the less beautiful, the soft, velvety-cushioned floor, the 
disintegrated dust of the ages, the musical tones varying in pitch 
given off by the stalactite formations as they varied in length, all 
these tend to make this Babylon's Cave a typical cave, more 
beautiful than the Mammoth, but whose extent is as yet unknown. 




o 



THE WORLD IS CLEFT. 

THE BIGGEST HOLE IN THE GROUND IN EXISTENCE NATURE PLOWED 

A GIANT FURROW. 

Fitz-Mac Has Been Viewing the Wonders of the Grand Canon of the 
Colorado, and Tells What He Saw and What Was Too Big for 
Him to Fully See. 

[From the Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colo.] 

Shrive yourself, O gabbling and exclamatory seeker of wonders! 
Shrive yourselves, O wearied and wearisome trotters of the round 
and whirling globe! If hither you are coming to bathe your fretted 
spirits in the red and yellow silences of this abysmal scene, shrive 
yourselves ere you approach, of all your little vain conceits, of all 
your petty, gabbling rhetorical formulas of exclamatory ecstasy. 
They have served you well enough, no doubt, to voice the whole 
gamut of your delight, surprise, and amazement in the presence of 
such noble and pleasing wonders as Niagara, Yosemite, Yellow- 
stone, or even the Alps, but such safe and well-authorized exclama- 
tions as "Magnificent!" "Grand!" "Sublime!" have only a 
remote and altogether inadequate relation to the emotions that will 
be stirred within you by the appalling grandeurs of this stupendous 
chasm. They do very well for Niagara, or Yosemite, or the Alps, 
where the emotions you experience though unusual are not unique. 
But here they do not fit. They do not half go round the girth of 
your amazement. They are altogether inadequate, and to utter 
them would be like offering the jacket of a schoolboy to clothe the 
shoulders of a giant. And if you do utter them, they will sound, 
even to your own ears, petty and almost meaningless unless, 
indeed, you be one of those inexorable egotists whose sturdy self- 
complacency no emotion can subordinate, in which case, of course, 
anything you could say would seem to yourself to dignify the occa- 
sion and the scene. 

137 



138 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 

But if you be only the amiable, chattering, inquisitive, common- 
place globe-trotter and searcher-out of wonders, shrive yourself, I 
say, of all your little, shallow affectations of delight; of all those 
petty formulas of rhetorical ecstasy which elsewhere very well 
conceal the hungry poverty of your feelings, for they would not 
serve you in this tragic and stupendous presence, but only shame 
you by their inadequacy. 

Pause as you approach, and remove the sandals from your feet, 
as one who hath sinned goeth up unto the holy places of the Lord 
seeking absolution. For thou hast sinned, O gushing and exclam- 
atory globe-trotter! thou hast sinned against the majesty and the 
power of Nature by rashly exclaiming in the presence of great 
Niagara, " Ne plus ultra! this is greatest!" or in the sublime 
shades of deep Yosemite by crying out, " There is nothing else 
so grand ! " or perchance, gazing entranced upon the sky-piercing 
majesty of the Alps thou hast said conclusively: " This is greater 
than all besides ! here Nature hath done her uttermost ! " 

But your rash conclusiveness has betrayed you, O shallow 
chatterer, into denying the power of Nature to surprise, to astonish, 
to amaze, to thrill, to overawe, to subdue and reduce, to silence 
your puerile, self-deceiving, exclamatory egotism by the tragic 
anguish of devastation immeasurable and the bewildering mystery 
of splendors unique, resistless, and overwhelming here presented. 
Here you might lose a hundred Yosemites and never be able to find 
them again. Here a dozen Niagaras would form but details in the 
stupendous scene. You might scatter the whole mass of the Alps 
through the 700 miles of this abysmal chasm without filling it up. 

It behooves you to come humbly and with bared feet into the 
presence of a wonder that dwarfs all other wonders of the world 
for it is here and not elsewhere that Nature hath done her uttermost; 
here a world's sublimest tragedy was enacted is still enacting 
with all scenes set; the tableau vivant of an immortal anguish, a 
glorified despair; pride and strength laid low and beauty bleeding; 
the triumph of chaos and devastation; a petrified woe, yet not 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 139 

ghastly and forbidding, strange to say, but fascinating, for this 
imperial tragedy of Nature is not set amidst ignoble and plebeian 
scenes, but is draped and curtained with every charm of color, with 
all the massive and imposing dignity of Pompeiian reds and 
yellows, with all the imperial magnificence of the Tyrian purple; 
with all the gorgeous splendors of orange hues and violet that go 
with a tropical sunset; with all the pensive beguilement of tender 
amber-greenish lights that belong to the creeping break of dawn 
and all these, the massive, the gorgeous, the magnificent, the sen- 
suous, the brilliant, the mellow, the tender, swept and swirled by 
great Nature's unerring brush into a ravishing, harmonious, chro- 
matic maze that bursts upon the view with an effect as if the skies 
had opened and all the choirs of heaven had broken into a grand 
and joyful overture, an allegro through which runs a penetrating 
minor chord of tragic sadness. 

And it is so, somewhat, if you have the impressional delicacy 
to feel it. Otherwise of course it is not so at all to you. For it is 
true or else the sympathy of one sense with another beguiles the 
reason that the colors in this ravishing chromatic maze are 
endued with the magic of melody and odor. 

But this is something incommunicable. It is probably not a 
thing to be insisted upon as a fact. Either you feel it or it is not 
so for you. 

I met a beautiful girl from Chicago out on " the rim " locally 
here they call the verge of the chasm the rim the other morning 
before sunrise, who was profoundly affected by it. She was a lovely 
and sensitive creature, just graduated from a fashionable boarding- 
school, and she was eating caramels and sobbing like a lost child. 

Anybody not quite as stolid and unimpressionable as the ox is 
pretty sure to have a sobbing spell here, especially if one gets off 
alone and yields himself up to the stupendous impressions of the 
scene, the sensation is so unique, so penetrating, so irresistible. It 
is really something of a pain a sweet discomfort, a miserable 
bliss like being in love, sadly and tearfully in love, with a girl 



140 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 

who is going to marry another fellow like but not the same. 
The inexorable most always affects us somewhat like that, and the 
unique beauty of this scene is of the inexorable sort. You may 
enjoy it, but you cannot possess it. You can add nothing to it by 
praise, take nothing from it by detraction. It is not the matchless 
immensity of it, I think, that overcomes you, but that your senses 
cannot quite encompass and analyze its unique and elusive quality. 
At first it is more or less appalling, I think, to everybody but 
only just at first, as an elephant would be to a little child. Pres- 
ently, like the child with the elephant, finding it does not crush 
you, you desire to become familiar with it, to patronize it, to make 
it feel that your intentions are entirely friendly. And then the 
elephantine impassiveness of the thing begins to irritate you, and 
yet to fascinate. Next you know you are in love with it. You 
want to remain forever; you want to leave at once; you don't 
know what you want. 

It is thus love always begins, thus always proceeds at least as 
far as I know anything about it. If you could only quarrel with 
this stupendous thing, and fling back at its feet all the beautiful 
things it has given you, then burst into tears and kiss and make up, 
it would be perfect. But you can't do it, you know. This great 
thing that frightens you by its appalling immensity, that enthralls 
you by the magic of its matchless beauty, that bewilders and mysti- 
fies your senses by the vague, odoriferous minor tones of its melo- 
dious purples, and by the vast, echoless silences of its Pompeiian 
reds and yellows, is inexorable to your puny emotions. That is 
what irritates you, what makes you sob unconsciously as you gaze 
off into the illimitable chromatic maze. 

Hither, to this point, long ago came Thomas Moran, the 
painter, and painted for the people of the United States that great 
scene which hangs in the capitol, and which, no doubt, has damaged 
his reputation with many people who regard it as a hysterical exag- 
geration, a sort of beautiful chromatic nightmare. 

But Moran's reputation will be utterly ruined with such people 




00 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 143 

when they see the grand chasm for themselves, and learn what 
broad concessions he made to the public incredulity regarding the 
scene. 

But for a truth the finest effects here are incommunicable by 
brush or pen. They give themselves up only to the personal pres- 
ence, and no painter nor writer can do more than suggest what 
they are by presenting something which they are a little like. You 
cannot paint a silence, nor a sound, nor an odor, nor an emotion, 
nor a sob. If you are skillful, you may suggest them to the imag- 
ination by some symbol understood, and Moran's fine picture does 
this admirably. It gives one sublime glimpse of those abysmal 
depths, one irresistible suggestion of those vast and sublime sil- 
ences, one momentary flash of that marvelous scheme of color 
suggesting melody and fragrance but only suggesting. Yet that 
is all which human skill can do with brush or pen. There are not 
colors for the brush, there are not symbols for the pen to convey 
the full impression of the immensity of the scene, its innumerable 
and measureless grandeurs. The scene in its stupendous ensemble 
is too vast for art. It is indeed almost too much for human nature. 
You cannot behold it for the first time without a gasp, however 
blase your spirits may have become by globe-trotting, because the 
spectacle is unique, and the impression is therefore unique too. 

There is a sublime pathos in it all which no art I think can 
touch or scarcely touch, for on reflection, I am not sure but 
Moran's noble picture does vaguely suggest it. It is this that 
presses the unconscious sob from your breast, that draws the pen- 
sive tears to your eyes, you know not why, as you gaze that is, if 
you happen to be gazing alone. It is as if you dreamed that God 
had died, and this deep chasm were the gorgeous and sublime sep- 
ulchre in which He was to be laid but of course if you are a 
natural insensate or a busy, gabbling, inquisitive, wearisome won- 
der-seeker, shallow of heart and shallow of head, you will be 
troubled by none of that vague, unique anguish about the death of 
God, or that equally vague and equally unique joy about the dis- 



144 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 

covery of melody and fragrance in those massive and gorgeous 
colors that give enchantment to the scene. You are altogether too 
practical and conclusive a being to think of getting any spiritual 
growth from the innumerable and incommunicable sublimities of 
this place. All that you want is facts facts and statistics of 
measurement to write down in that detestable note-book you are 
carrying around in your hand. You have no time for vague and 
nebulous impressions about fragrant and melodious colors swathing 
the sepulchre of God. You are not rendered blissfully miserable 
by the strange emotions which the splendors and the immensity of 
the spectacle arouse within you. You don't want any vague, 
nebulous, incommunicable, soul-broadening sentimentality in yours 
not if you know yourself. What you want is something to 
gabble about after you leave measurements, facts, and figures. 

Do I know how many thousand feet it is down to the bottom of 
the chasm where we catch, here and there, a glimpse of a little 
ribbon of water ? Do I think it is really nearly 7,000 feet in the 
perpendicular and about three miles in the slant five by the trail? 
Is the trail safe ? Is it dangerous ? Does it really take two days to 
go down and back ? Can it be possible ? Do I think that it is really 
and truly thirteen miles across to the opposite rim of the chasm ? 
Why it looks as if one might call to a person over there. Can it be 
possible that this chasm is 700 miles long ? Do I believe it ? Is n't it 
incredible that we can be standing here on this rim in the very center 
of the whole geological series of the earth's crust, with that yawning 
abyss reaching more than a mile deeper, and the river running in the 
archean granite ? How can they know that the geological horizon 
in which we are standing here on this rim is the upper carboniferous ? 
By this cherty limestone ? Is cherty spelled c-h-u-r-t-y or c-h-i-r ? 
Do I believe the Government really paid Moran $i8,ooofor a 
picture ? 

Sir, or madam, whichever your sex may be, you are no doubt a 
perfectly respectable and worthy person, but to me, at this time and 
in this place, you are, with your gabbling, inquisitive tongue and 



GRAND CANON OP THE COLORADO RIVER. 145 

your note-book, an insufferable bore. Pray address your questions 
to somebody interested in the mensurations and the geology of this 
overwhelming spectacle. I am only concerned with the impressions 

it makes upon my senses, and I don't care a whether it is 7,000 

feet or 7,000 miles down to the bottom of the chasm. To me it is 
just as far as it seems, and I don't care what the figures are. It is 
the deepest, the most stupendous, the most appalling, the most 
mystically beautiful, the most sublimely pathetic in a word, the 
most moving and irresistible tragedy I have ever beheld or ever 
expect to, and I wish you would leave me to enjoy my own im- 
pressions. As you are unable to share them, I beg that you will be 
so good as not to interrupt them with questions in mensuration and 
kindergarten geology. I don't know whether cherty is spelled with 
u or i or an ox-yoke, and I don't care a ; . All that you ask, 
and a thousand times more, you will find authoritatively stated in 
the reports of several scientific surveys made by the Government 
and printed as public documents. 

They will be found in any public library worthy of the name in 
the United States. Ask the librarian to let you see the Report on 
the Expedition of Lieutenant Whipple, in 1853-4; the Expedition 
of Lieutenant Ives, in 1858; that of Major Powell, about 1868; that 
by Lieutenant Wheeler, published in 1875, vol. Ill, and whatever 
else has followed. If you have not easy access to a large public 
library, send to " The Bureau of Scientific Surveys, Washington," 
(this is not the exact title, but it will do,) and ask for a catalogue of 
the publications bearing on the Grand Canon of the Colorado. 
From this you can select what you want, and perhaps obtain it free 
through your Member of Congress; if not, the cost is but a trifle. 

Major Powell's book is the thing you should get. 

The railroad does not come within sixty-five miles of the Grand 
Canon. You leave the cars at Flagstaff, Arizona, and come out by 
the daily stage. It is an easy and delightful ride of ten or eleven 
hours, most of the way through the beautiful, park-like Coconino 
pine forest and " The National Grand Canon Reserve," which con- 



146 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE GRAND CANON. 

tains about 2,000,000 acres. The road lies along the base of the 
beautiful San Francisco Mountains, and you are whirled along at 
breezy speed, in an easy coach, behind a champing four-in-hand team, 
through a charming succession of sylvan scenes, in a crisp and 
bracing atmosphere that comes to your lungs laden with homely 
odor of pine and the bewitching fragrance of wild flowers. The 
horses are changed four times on the way and so are always fresh, 
and there is none of the old, dusty, thumping stage-coach sensation 
of dragging along. 

Come to see it. There is no hardship in the journey. You 
must not conclude that because it is in Arizona it will be found hot. 
The altitude prevents. All the way from Flagstaff " to the rim " it 
is about 7,000 feet. 

Come and see it. The trip will be a grand episode in your life. 
The matchless spectacle will become a noble and deathless memory. 

Come and behold the marvelous vision where silence has dimen- 
sion and color; where color has melody and fragrance. 

Come and dream of the gorgeous and appalling sepulchre of 
God and then you will realize how inadequately I have, in this hasty 
sketch, suggested to your imagination its stupendous glories and its 
sublime pathos. Frrz-MAC. 



THE GRAND CANON CAVERN. 

[From the Coconino Sun, Flagstaff, Arizona.] 

To a cook named Joseph Gildner, employed in the mining camp 
of Messrs. Cameron & Berry in the Grand Canon of the Colorado 
near Flagstaff, Arizona, belongs the honor of discovering what 
savants had looked for in vain, although they had every reason to 
presume that what they sought was in existence, and what geologists 
have long desired to find, in the hope that some further light might 
be thrown upon some matters connected with the geological forma- 
tion of the Grand Canon, which hitherto could only be conjectured. 
It has long been contended that if caves could only be discovered 
some more definite information could be gleaned of the many thou- 
sands of feet of strata which it is claimed by geologists have been 
swept away by erosion from the surface of this platform. Several 
of the caves have lately been discovered, but only one so far has 
been partially explored, and that is the one located by the man 
Gildner. 

Standing on Clear Creek Canon, a mile below the plateau on 
which the camp and mines are situated, and looking up at the en- 
trance to this cave, one is filled with vague horror and amazement 
at the mere thought of any one venturing to climb along the pre- 
cipitous face of the mountain to explore its depths. Even with the 
aid of a powerful glass it does not seem possible that a chamois or 
mountain goat could find a foothold there. How the man ever 
got there in the first instance without a rope or any other assistance 
and escaped falling down and being dashed to pieces at the base of 
the rock, a precipitous descent of over 1,000 feet, is a mystery. 
But certain it is he got there and found two entrances to the cave, 
through one of which he was barely able to drag his body, but the 
vision he there beheld in the dim, imperfect light made him quickly 
withdraw and acquaint the manager and active partner of the 
mine, Mr. P. D. Berry, with his discovery. 

149 



150 



PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 



The cliff in which this cave was discovered rises almost abruptly 
from the plateau on which the camp is situated, and frowns down 
menacingly on the canon below. It is truly a very forbidding 
object, composed of a dirty reddish limestone formation, and seems 
to warn the venturesome that death awaits him who would pry too 
closely into the secrets that Nature has so closely guarded in her im- 
penetrable bosom. But such considerations have but little weight 
with the men who establish the frontier settlements, and next morning 
Mr. Berry had a gang of men employed digging a trail from the 
summit of the plateau to the mouth of the cave. The work was 
arduous, but the persistent labor of the men was amply rewarded, 
and now they have got a trail that any one can walk along without 
danger, a splendid platform at the mouth of the cave about six feet 
wide, and the entrance has been enlarged until a man can almost 
walk into it erect. 

To describe it as a cave is not literally correct. It is rather an 
intricate series of caves branching out one from the other, and ex- 
tending in every direction under the mountains. The first cave or 
compartment is fully 300 feet long and of varying height, extend- 
ing from about ten feet in some places to eighty or ninety feet in 
others, and the view presented to the beholder is almost sufficient to 
take one's breath away. Pendent from the ceiling and the sides of 
the cave are the most beautiful formations of stalactite, and the 
reflection from these as the light of candles or torches is thrown on 
them is dazzling in its brilliancy. But while the glance is momen- 
tarily riveted on the scene here exposed to view, attention is almost 
insensibly drawn to the floor beneath. There a view is presented 
that beggars description. At first glance it would seem as if the 
bottom of the Indian Ocean had been suddenly transplanted for the 
benefit of the visitors to this cave. Mountain after mountain of 
coral, pink and white, appear in rapid succession, while sea ane- 
mones of every conceivable hue and color seem to float around in 
endless variety. There are parterres and rows of flowers arranged 
in such order that it would put any landscape painter to the blush, 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 151 

while the bowers and grottoes that abound might have served as a 
resting-place for Queen Mab and her fairy satellites. 

The second cave is of about the same dimensions as the first, but 
much higher, and the columns of stalactite are very much larger 
and more diversified in shape. Here large pieces of stalactite have 
fallen from the roof and sides of the cave, pressed down by the 
superincumbent weight, and been shattered to atoms on the floor 
below, while vast sheets hang from the walls with scarcely any 
perceptible support, revealing almost every form of animate or 
inanimate nature, grotesque at times, 'tis true, but always with a 
sufficiently strong resemblance. Here may be found the jaws of 
leviathan sharks, the serrated rows of teeth looking as ugly as if the 
monster were springing from the deep to tear down its victim who 
was being hoisted on board a vessel; there the deadly swordfish, with 
its cruel, sharp weapon, ever in readiness for attack or defense; 
while in the most inconceivable places may be found saws of every 
description, from the tiniest to the big cross-cut. 

But the most wonderful sight of all is what is called the " White 
Cave." Shortly after entering, the visitor is confronted with a lion 
rampant on a pedestal about eighteen inches long. The figure 
stands about a foot high and is as nearly perfect in detail as any- 
thing that ever left the sculptor's or molder's hands. A few feet 
from there stands a Burmese pagoda which, when a candle is placed 
in rear of it, seems to be lighted up as if for service, while the 
sacred elephant stands out in bold relief in dazzling whiteness, a 
piece of crystallized lime forming the eye which, with the glare of 
the candle upon it, seems to flash out luridly and angrily at having 
been disturbed after ages of repose. 

It would be impossible to describe the various compartments the 
writer went through in a journey of about four hours. Many of them 
are of such enormous height that the flare of the candles or torches 
serves to reveal nothing but impenetrable blackness up above, while 
the sides in all cases are lined with the most fantastic and grotesque 
shapes. In one place is to be found a bay window, the curtains and 



152 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE GRAND CANON. 

window blinds arranged in the most artistic manner, while every- 
where you can select your own chime of bells and discourse sweet 
music with cymbals thrown in. 

A peculiar feature about this cave is, that whereas most of the 
stalactite is formed by white limestone, there is none of that sub- 
stance now forming the rock, the upper strata being composed of 
the red limestone, and it will be a question for geologists to deter- 
mine what period of time has elapsed since this stalactite, whiter 
than alabaster, was formed. Moreover, everything in the cave at 
the present time is as dry as tinder, and it would seem as if 
centuries had elapsed since any water percolated through. A 
bathroom there is of enormous dimensions, but no trace of water, 
nor is there any evidence of animal life beyond the nests made by 
some rats. 

The cave varies from about ten feet high at the entrance to where 
you cannot see the top. Its width is from sixty to seventy feet, but 
its length has not yet been determined on, and it is simply a matter 
of conjecture as to where it leads. About 100 feet from the en- 
trance the visitor is confronted with a regular forest of trees from 
eight to ten feet in height, the branches and leaves being almost as 
perfect as in a natural forest. And yet these are all formed of stal- 
agmite of dazzling whiteness. 

The cave also abounds in grotesque forms pendant from the roof 
and sides, and any one visiting the Grand Canon of the Colorado 
will miss one of the principal attractions if they omit to see them. 




GOING TO THE GRAND CANON. 



AN ENTHUSIASTIC DESCRIPTION. 

BY G. WHARTON JAMES, PASADENA, CAL. 

The Grand Canon! God's stupendous masterpiece on earth! 
A mountain chain turned upside down and thrust into the world's 
crust, with all its ravines, crests, gorges, ridges, detached peaks 
and forests, and at the lowest point of the V, made the bed of an 
immense river. A chaos of color such as no mountain range on 
earth ever resembled, for, while there are forests, there are hundreds 
of square miles of bare, barren, solid rock in all the colors, shades 
and tints of the rainbow, a striking red being the dominant note in 
this novel harmony of colors. A wilderness of architectural forms 
such as no other wilderness affords, or dream of earth's paltry 
builders ever conceived, for here are suggestions for new styles of 
architecture when Assyrian, Egyptian, Hindoo, Greek, Roman, 
Tartarian, Gothic, Florentine, Elizabethan, and more modern styles 
are relegated to the lumber-piles of the ages. Towers, domes, 
obelisks, palaces, cathedrals, castles innumerable, stupendous in 
size, grand and majestic in ensemble, harmonious in proportion, 
novel in architecture. With cunning skill the chisels of the ages, 
the gnawing forces of Nature, have molded and shaped the slowly- 
yielding rock to suit the mind of the Master Architect, and man, 
astounded, bewildered, delighted, gazes at the results in entrance- 
ment. 

Reached from Flagstaff and other points on the great transcon- 
tinental line of the Santa Fe Railway, that traveler affords himself 
a scenic banquet, incomparable and unique, who visits this 
unequaled "Water-way of the Gods." According to the concep- 
tions of the localized aborigines, this vast chasm was made by their 
most powerful gods, and to prevent weak, puny, curious man from 
following them to the abodes of deity, they turned the vast stream 

155 



156 PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE 

of the Colorado River into its depths. But " in the days when the 
world will be aged" the course of the stream will be diverted, and 
the gods will come again to earth. Arid, slightly to the left of 
Grand View Point, at the head of the Grand View trail, reached 
from Flagstaff, three-fourths of the way across the canon can be 
seen the giant, rocky gateway through which the new-coming gods 
will make their descent. 

Directly across is the vast wall of the great Kaibab plateau, one 
of the highest portions of the whole rim of the canon. Slightly to 
the right, the most imposing of all the towers of this gloriously 
carved region is one named "Powell's Temple," dedicated to that 
indefatigable and daring explorer, Major J. W. Powell, formerly 
director of the United States Geological Survey and the Bureau of 
Ethnology, and to whose endeavors the exploration of the long and 
dangerous depths of the canons of the Colorado was due. 

On the south side of the canon are the Three Castles, on a 
tilting stratum of rock, and a little beyond is "Ayer's Peak," so 
named from Mrs. E. E. Ayer, of Chicago, the first white woman 
who is known to have made the descent to the river at this point. 

Several miles to the east, still on the south side, its summit 
crowned and shaded by a portion of the vast Coconino Forest, is 
Moran's Point, on which the great artist made his noted painting of 
the canon, and, a few miles beyond, is Bissel's Point, from which 
an extended view is had of the sculptured forms made by the influx 
of the Little Colorado River, and the open space in the canon 
through which the Colorado Grande winds its tortuous way towards 
the sea. Across from Bissel's Point is Cape Final, the last great 
cape of the Kaibab plateau. 

It is from just above this point the real Grand Canon begins. 
While Marble, Glen, and a score of other canons higher up the river 
are stupendous, marvelous, grand, it is only when the river reaches 
the primeval rock, the granite, of which the foundations of the world 
are formed, that the sublime depths of this unique waterway are 
disclosed. For a distance of some two hundred and seventeen 



GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO RIVER. 157 

miles the river rages and dashes and roars, pouring its tremendous 
flood headlong to the passage it has cut through the sandy deserts 
of Eastern California, and this two hundred and seventeen miles 
only is known distinctively as The Grand Canon. No other canon in 
the world should be known by that name, no matter how qualified. 
Just as it seems irreverent to use the name of the Deity to designate 
false gods, so is it to use the name of this solitary piece of divinely 
wrought grandeur for any inferior work. 

For over a decade I have been closely studying it, wandering 
along its rim for hundreds of miles, exploring its side canons in 
every direction, and seeking to penetrate to the secrets of its lowest 
depths. Months and months of familiar study have not lessened its 
attractions, nor lowered the profound feelings of awe with which it 
has always impressed me. I return to it constantly as a lover to 
his mistress, a student to his books, a chemist to the mysteries he 
would solve, a prospector to the gold he would discover, and 1 ever 
and always do I find in it new treasures of sublime grandeur, new 
glories of stupendous carving, new entrancements of gorgeous 
coloring, all declaring in their own unmistakable language, 
"The hand that made us is Divine." 



THE GRAND CANON, 

[From the Coconino Sun, Flagstaff, Arizona.] 

The Grand Canon is the most wonderful geological and speo 
tacular phenomenon known to mankind. It was no exaggeration 
to call it the sublimest of gorges, the Titan of chasms. There is. 
but one Grand Canon, and nowhere on earth can its like be found. 
Language is too faint and weak to convey any adequate idea of the 
sublimity and grandeur of this most awe-inspiring of Nature's 
wondrous works. It must be seen to be appreciated, and even then 
humanity stands aghast, oppressed with an indefinable sense of 
terror, while at the same time all the senses are charmed with the 
indescribable beauties that are opened up to the vision. An 
eminent writer in describing it defined it as " An inferno, swathed 
in soft celestial fires; a whole chaotic under-world, just emptied of 
primeval floods and waiting for a new creative world; a boding, 
terrible thing, unflinchingly real, yet spectral as a dream, eluding 
all sense of perspective or dimension; outstretching the faculty of 
measurement, overlapping the confines of definite apprehension." 

This stupendous panorama is situated wholly in the northern 
part of Arizona. Correctly speaking, it is not a canon, but rather 
an intricate system of canons, all subordinate to the river channel, 
and forming a whole that is fully one thousand square miles in 
extent. 



161 



HOW TO GET THERE. 

To those to whom the Grand Canon of the Colorado is a terra 
incognito a few words may not be amiss as to how to get there. 
Starting from any point where the Santa Fe railroad has either a 
direct line of communication, Albuquerque, N. M., is easily reached, 
and from thence on to Flagstaff, Ariz., the traveler is carried on 
through some of the most beautiful and diversified scenery of the 
Rockies. Arriving at Flagstaff a stagecoach is taken to the Grand 
Canon. Then the drive is sixty-five miles long, which is easily 
accomplished in ten hours, there being four relays of horses for the 
journey, so that the animals are always fresh, and the road being a 
solid mountain road free from any obstructions, jars and jolts are 
almost unknown. The course is along what is perhaps the most 
beautiful scenery in Arizona or elsewhere. For the first twenty 
miles it lies through a beautiful forest of pine trees, dotted here and 
there with parks, circling the base of the far-famed San Francisco 
Mountains, past the pre-historic cave dwellings and away out into 
the open prairie, relieved by tracts of scrub cedar and pinyon trees, 
the home of the prairie-dog and antelope. An excellent lunch can 
be procured at Cedar Ranch, thirty-four miles from Flagstaff, and 
thence once more away across the prairie through Cottontail Canon, 
where geologists can find much to interest them, one side of the 
canon, which is only about fifty feet wide, being composed of lime- 
stone formation while the opposite side is malapai. Then bounding 
over the prairie again until Moqui is reached, and a few miles 
further when the road again lies through the lordly Coconino forest 
interspersed with sylvan glades and fragrant meadows for about 
twelve miles. 

The caves, which now form one of the principal of the many 
attractions of the Grand Canon, can only be reached by the 
Cameron or Grand View trail. 

G. K. WOODS, 

General Manager Grand Canon Stage Line. 
163 



T7OR any further information in regard to the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River in 
Arizona, or this volume, address, 

G. K. WOODS, 

General Manager Grand Canon Stage Line 
Flagstaff, Arizona Ten